Saint Catharine College Clock Tower photo

News Release Index

St. Catharine College transcript information 

To receive a transcript prior to July 31:

Transcripts can be requested by emailing afoster@sccky.edu for directions on ordering or calling 859-336-5082, ext. 1212 for directions. Due the call volume for transcript requests, we would recommend using email. Please note, it is the responsibility of the student to address any remaining balances or holds in order to receive transcripts. You can contact the business office to address payment matters: businessoffice@sccky.edu.  

Official transcripts can be ordered online through our website at www.sccky.edu. On the home page scroll down to the mySCC link, then select Request my Transcript.  From there you will enter your personal information, the name of the school and how you wish for us to send it to your school, then provide your credit card information (for credit card processing fee only).  You will need to sign a consent form which authorizes us to release your transcript to another institution.  You will receive email updates as to the status of your online transcript order.

Students also have the option to complete the transcript request form under Request my Transcript and send that it or bring it in.

If you have additional questions, email us at registrar@sccky.edu.

How would I get my transcripts if just applied to the college and just got admitted?You can request these documents by contacting the Admissions Office: admissions@sccky.edu


To receive a transcript after July 31:

Transcripts may be requested by email at transcripts@oppeace.org or by phone at (859) 336-9303. 

Hanover College in Indiana will host a visit day for St. Catharine College. 
The event will be on Tuesday, June 28, and students have the option of a 9 a.m. or 1 p.m. visit.  Hanover will have administrators from admissions, financial aid, athletics and the registrar's office available to meet with students one-on-one.  
For more information, visit www.hanover.edu/admission/visits/scc.

Dr. Becky Lee Meadows, professor of English at St. Catharine College, recently had her work accepted for publication with The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, an online literary journal.

The creative non-fiction flash piece, titled "Boo Boo Kitty," will appear in the February issue for the journal's "The Day I Grew Up" special section.

"The story is about my cousin, Susie Burgess, and me was we are confronted with the reality of death through a beloved pet," Meadows said. "It pinpoints the love of animals we had growing up in the country surrounded by them, and it also addresses the gender issues two young girls growing up on a farm face."

Meadows said "Boo Boo Kitty" is one of several pieces of flash fiction she plans to be in a larger anthology. The Dead Mule also published "Three Seconds," another piece of her flash fiction, in June 2014.

The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature can be viewed online at deadmule.com.  

Founded in the Dominican tradition in 1931 and sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Peace, St. Catharine College, a Catholic Dominican college inspired by its founders, welcomes all to the challenging pursuit of truth, preparing them to become critical thinkers, ethical leaders and engaged citizens.

Carol Scherbak, chair of the radiation therapy department at St. Catharine College, and Carla Ballard, a senior radiation therapy student, attended the radiation therapy annual conference in San Antonio, Texas late last semester.

The conference was hosted by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) and held in conjunction with the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO).

"This conference brings together radiation oncology professionals from all over the U.S. and around the world," Scherbak said.

Scherbak gave a presentation titled "Integrating VERT in the Treatment Planning Curriculum" at the VERT Educators workshop at the conference. 

Last semester St. Catharine College named Ashley Holt Dudgeon as the new director of admissions.

"St. Catharine is truly a wonderful fit for me," Dudgeon said. "I feel almost as though I've always been here, yet the time is definitely flying. It is especially exciting to be here in such a transitional time. With such a strong foundation and heritage, and new leadership in place, it will be exciting to see how we come together as a campus community to take an already great institution to new heights."

Dudgeon previously served as an admissions counselor and later as associate director of admissions at St. Catharine. She began her career in higher education as an admissions intern and an orientation intern while studying at Campbellsville University. She later worked at Lindsey Wilson College in the development office.  

Equipped with an MBA with an emphasis on marketing, Dudgeon also teaches courses in the business department. Courses have included management, strategic planning, motivation and leadership.

Her marketing background has also helped in her role as director of admissions.

"Since marketing is ever-changing, I think the most important thing I took away from my degree and experience has been to always be observant and proactive of past, present and potential trends," Dudgeon said. "In a society that is saturated with the media and consumerism, standing out can be the most difficult and thus the most important thing. It can be done however, by staying aware of market trends."  

Dudgeon has been married to Chris Dudgeon for two years and they currently reside in Campbellsville, but they will begin renovations on a house in Bloomfield soon. She and Chris have two fur-children, Bandit (a dog) and Zorro (a cat). Dudgeon has also owned and operated her own photography company for the past six years and is an active member of her church, Bloomfield Baptist.

A St. Catharine College staff member was recently elected to the highest office in the Kentucky Association of Housing Officers (KAHO).

Chris Owens, Director of Residence Life at St. Catharine, was named president-elect during the 2015 KAHO conference held in October at St. Catharine College. Owens was named acting president shortly after his nomination, as the previous president of KAHO left the state for another opportunity.  

Owens previously served as the annual conference chair and small schools representative.

"In this role I worked with the small schools around the state to educate them about the organization and provide professional development opportunities," Owens said.

 The 2015 KAHO conference was hosted at St. Catharine College in October and was a tremendous success according to Owens.

"We were able to bring 17 schools to our campus with a majority of them visiting for the first time," Owens said. "We brought 78 delegates total to visit with multiple vendors."

Tibetan monks from the Tashi Kyil Monastery in Dehra Dun, India will be at St. Catharine College for a variety of activities from Jan. 25 - 30. The monks hosted a traditional Tibetan dinner at St. Catharine College in November.

The monks will have merchandise for sale, much of which is made by Tibetan refugees living in India.

The itinerary for their upcoming visit is as follows:

Monday, Jan. 25

10 a.m. - Opening ceremony

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. - Sand mandala at the Emily W. Hundley Library

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. - Three monks will travel with Matt Branstetter to a school in Versailles and then to Lexington for yoga at Centered from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The suggested donation is $20. For more information, contact Lauren Higdon at (859) 721-1841 or at centeredlex.com.

                Centered

                309 N. Ashland Ave. Suite 180

                Lexington, KY 40502

Tuesday, Jan. 26

11 a.m. - 7 p.m. - Sand mandala

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Monastic debate demonstration

5 p.m. - 7 p.m. - Children art workshop

Wednesday, Jan. 27

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. - Sand mandala

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - The Art of Chanting & Hand Mudra workshop

Thursday, Jan. 28

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. - Sand mandala

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Compassion and happiness (Path to Enlightenment) talk

Friday, Jan. 29

9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - Sand mandala

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Dissolution of sand

7 p.m. - Monks perform Skeleton Dance, followed by traditional Tibetan dinners with the monks at St. Catharine. Tickets are required at a suggested price of $25.

For ticket information, contact:

Jody Mattingly at (270) 692-8201

Tonya Leger at (859) 552-4275

Matt Branstetter at (859) 559-8891 or mbranstetter@sccky.edu

8 p.m. - After-dinner program. Presentation includes chanting followed by a presentation of the history of the monastery. This is open to the public and donations are accepted.

Saturday, Jan. 30

9 a.m. - 10 a.m. - House blessing and business blessing

10 a.m. - Departure

St. Catharine College began a new holiday tradition this year, inviting the North Pole's most notable resident and one of his elves to campus for a community event.

The event, which was open to the St. Catharine community and the general public, featured a Christmas tree lighting outside of the Emily W. Hundley Library, pictures with Santa Claus and holiday treats such as cider, hot chocolate and cookies. St. Catharine College's A Cappella group, Patriot Keys, sang Christmas carols outside by the tree.  

"We saw this as a great opportunity to welcome the public to our campus to meet with Santa and share in the holiday spirit," Dr. Cindy Gnadinger, St. Catharine College's president, said. "We had a great turnout and we hope for an even larger crowd next year." 

St. Catharine College President Dr. Cindy Gnadinger recently named Louisville restaurant legend Susan Seiller as Director for Dining Services at the college in Central Kentucky.

Seiller has owned three restaurants in Louisville, including Jack Fry's and most recently, Relish.

"We are excited about the culinary experience Ms. Seiller brings to our campus," Gnadinger said. "Our students will benefit from her deep commitment to bring fresh, locally sourced food and expanded menu selections to the Spalding Dining Center."

Seiller describes her culinary approach as using lots of fresh produce and bright, globally influenced cuisine.

She earned her Bachelor of Science from Cornell University's College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. Besides owning and consulting in the field, she has worked in restaurants in New York City. She has over 40 years of professional experience in the food industry.
If you were unable to attend the opening of the Norma Jean Campbell exhibit at the Emily W. Hundley Library, you can catch video of the reception here.

St. Catharine College recently announced the list of students who have achieved extraordinary academic success for the fall 2015 semester.

The dean's list includes all students who had a grade point average of 3.6 - 3.999. The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Sebastian Barrientos, Michelle Beatty, Sara Blanford, Brian Boone, Rebecca Brady, Max Bristow, Shakera Butler, Brandon Cambron, David Carmona, Brianna Cornett, Rachel Cox, Mollica Crawford, Jessie Crouch, Nicole Denman, Magdalyn Durbin, Jessica Frailey, Amanda Garrett, Candice Gaus Henderson, Julia Gindoy, Kelsey Givens, Casey Grant, Joseph Hayes, Leah Hill, Joe Jessop, Ivan Kerkoc Portillo, Taylor Kindschy, Jodie Klein, Alexander Knowles, Cody Kollenberg, Kameron Lackey, Daniel Lerma, Matthew Lowndes, Joseph Martin, Jacob McCoy, William McKenty, Logan Medley, Savannah Moreland, Patricia Moyer, Christina Mudd, Sarah Pascoe, Amanda Perkins, Dakota Prichard, Krzysztof Rapacz, Alexandrea Richards, Crystal Riley, Sasha Ruiz-Lopez Shelby Rush, Dawn Scott, Marci Smith, Nicholas Sneed, Morgan Stine, Zachariah Sullivan, David Tackett, Kiara Thompson, Sie Tioye, Samantha Travillian, Rodney Vuick, Tiffany Webb, Kalyn Weddle, Mary Welch, Kayla Wilson, Rebecca Woford and Hannah Wolf.

The president's list includes all students who completed 12 college-level credit hours and maintained a perfect 4.0 grade point average. The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Courtney Anderson, Kelci Ball, Casey Baryla, Emily Belt, Emily Bishop, Caitlyn Blair, Heather Brabon, Madison Brady, Andrew Brown, Dylan Brown, Anna Burdette, Jessica Burgess, Cynthia Cavazos, Sarah Colvin, Amanda Conrad, Alysa Coomes, Kourtney Current, Sofia Esteban Serna, Mary Ezaizat, Shelby Floyd, Ramie Goldey, Michael Hardin, Tiera Heady, Sara Herbert, Mary Hutchins, Stacy Hutchins, Ruth Kayembe, Harry Kirwan, Jillian Leake, Michael Lewis, Jordan Loy, Amelia Mattingly, Charles Nadorff, Teagan Overturf, Brooke Pearson, Brandyn Pemberton, Allison Reed, Sally Rios, Stacey Ryan, Alice Shacklette, William Shepherd, Kinsy Shofner, Katherine Simpson, Taylor Smith, Andrea Spalding, Shelby Spalding, Hannah Spaulding, Cierra Toler, Haylie Walter, Marvin Wesselburg, Meghan Wolford and Emily Zubricky.

The provost's list includes Commander College students who had a grade point average of 3.6 or higher with a minimum of 12 credit hours. The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Brittany Greenwell and Noah Hutchins.

St. Catharine College invites the community to the opening reception of "Down on the Farm," a fiber art exhibit by Washington County resident Norma Jean Campbell. The reception, sponsored by the SCC Fine Arts Committee, will be held in the mezzanine of the Emily W. Hundley Library on Sunday, December 13 from 5:00-6:30pm. (The event begins after the Mid-Kentucky Arts Christmas concert, which will be held in St. Catharine Hall from 3:00-5:00pm.) Campbell will give a short talk to discuss her artistic process and materials.

 

Campbell's work ranges from needle-felted sculptures to hand-woven textiles using historical Kentucky designs. She processes wool from sheep she raises on her West Wind Farm and dyes it using natural materials found on the farm, such as goldenrod and walnut husks. She also incorporates into her pieces clay dug from the farm as well as found objects.

 

Recent articles in The Springfield Sun (http://www.thespringfieldsun.com/content/campbell-enjoys-lifetime-crafting) and The Lexington Herald-Leader (http://www.kentucky.com/living/family/article44680902.html) provide detailed descriptions of Campbell's work.

The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. "Down on the Farm" will be on display at SCC through March 2016.

 

Additional information and optional RSVP:  https://www.facebook.com/events/1526093174369397/

FRANKFORT, KY - The Kentucky Arts Council has selected Matthew Gaddie to be a consultant

with the Kentucky Peer Advisory Network program.  Professionals on this advisor directory are referred by the arts council to artists and organizations that require assistance in the technical and business aspects of being an arts entrepreneur or a thriving arts organization. Most importantly, advisors in KPAN are available to provide consultancies to assist with board development, grant writing, marketing and promotions, strategic planning, fund raising, festival planning and other activities.  Kentucky Peer Advisory Network consultants bring many areas of expertise to the field and have received consultancy training from Craig Dreeszen of the Arts Extension Service of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, the nation's leading provider of professional arts management education.  Kentucky was one of the first states to adopt the peer advisory network. 

 

The mission of the Kentucky Arts Council is to foster environments for the people of Kentucky to value, participate in, and benefit from the arts.  The KAC believes that the arts and cultural resources of Kentucky are key to understanding our heritage, and that honoring the past will help build our future.  The Kentucky Arts Council believes it is important for individuals and organizations to advocate for the arts and promote how they enhance communities and lives. 

 

Matthew's consultancy begins January 15, 2016.  He joins a celebrated group of peer advisors from across the state.

The following is a press release from the National Hemp Association featuring St. Catharine College student Mike Lewis and his U.S. flag made from hemp.


Washington, DC; November 9, 2015 - An American flag made of Kentucky industrial hemp grown by United States Veterans will be flown over the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC for the first time on Veteran's Day (Wednesday, Nov. 11) to symbolize how this versatile crop cultivated by our founding fathers can today provide a significant source of jobs for veterans and rural farming families.

 

To celebrate and help educate about hemp for veterans, farmers and an economic driver, Mike Lewis, Director of Growing Warriors, Joe Schroeder, CEO of Freedom Seed and Feed, and other veteran-farmers, James Woosley, former CIA Director and Secretary of the Navy, Commissioner James Comer of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, and industrial hemp industry groups are hosting a Hemp for Vets Press Conference on Wednesday, November 11 from 9:30 am - 10:30 am in the Murrow Room at the National Press Club, 529 14th St. NW, Washington DC 20045.  

 

Once considered America's most important cash crop (Thomas Jefferson), industrial hemp has been misclassified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance (along with narcotics such as heroin and LSD). This misinformation was fueled in 1937 when New York Senator William Hearst, whose paper business was threatened by the sustainable hemp plant (yield from one acre of hemp equals four acres of trees) used Hearst newspapers to conduct a smear campaign to mislead the American people to believe the crop was a dangerous psychoactive drug - the first case of "yellow journalism." As a result, hemp is illegal at the federal level. U.S. hemp farmers cannot transport seeds across state lines, can't obtain bank accounts and can't get crop insurance.

 

In 2014, U.S. sales of hemp food, health and beauty products were $200 million. This figure does not include hemp products for clothing, textiles, auto parts, paper products, building materials, nor health, beauty and food products sold at Costco and Whole Foods Market - both of which do not provide sales data. It is estimated that 2014 annual retail sales for hemp products is between $500 and $620 million. Consumer sales of hemp food and body care products rose 21.2% in 2014 over a year earlier (source: SPINS data). The Hemp Business Journal estimates the U.S. hemp industry will reach $1.5 billion in consumer sales by 2020 (source: HempBizJournal.com). 

 

The U.S. hemp sales cited above were products made from imported hemp rather than U.S.-sourced industrial hemp grown by American farmers. Industrial hemp is legal in 30 countries around the world.

 

"Hemp was a crop that built our nation," said U.S. Veteran and Kentucky hemp farmer Mike Lewis, Executive Director of the Growing Warriors Project, the first federally authorized hemp farm in America farmed by disabled veterans. "Betsy Ross' first American flag was made of hemp. We have flags made in China now. That's almost sacrilegious," said Lewis, who grew the Kentucky industrial hemp used to make the Hemp American Flag. Lewis served in the "Commander in Chiefs Guard" of the 3rd U.S. Infantry from 1992 to 1995. 

 

 "Hemp played a pivotal role in the founding of our country," said James Woosley, former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, former Secretary of the Navy and long-time hemp advocate. "The early hemp paper mills made possible both the colonial free press and the stock for our legal tender.  Hemp canvas protected the conestoga wagons as our early pioneers braved their movement westward. In colonial America, a farmer could be jailed for NOT growing hemp. The hemp crop provided sails for our Navy ships; it gave us the first printed bible and Rembrandt shared his artistic brilliance with the world on hemp canvas. Today's veterans are on the front lines of the battle to return this important crop back to America's farms," added Woosley, who serves on the Board of Directors of the North American Industrial Hemp Council.

 

" If a hemp industry is to thrive in America again, and provide the stability for so many communities that tobacco once did, it has to start with the stability of the small farmer," said Joe Schroeder, CEO of Freedom Seed and Feed, an agricultural enterprise production and processing company. "Freedom Seed and Feed now has a unique opportunity to play a major role in re-building Kentucky's position as a world leader in industrial hemp production. Together we can create stability for small farmers all the way up the supply chain. This is an exciting opportunity to build an agricultural industry from the ground up that favors small family farmers in rural America."

 

 "We are proud to honor the great work by the Growing Warriors network," said Mike Bowman, a fifth generation farmer from Colorado, and Board Chair of the National Hemp Association, a non-profit trade association for the hemp industry. "After serving our country, these men and women have returned home to lead the effort of rebuilding our rural economies.  Their leadership on the battlefield has transitioned to leadership at the local level. They are not only brave Americans, but genuine heroes. Today we are here to convey our debt of gratitude."

 

"Today as we remember and thank veterans for keeping us free, we ask Congress and the President to restore their right to grow industrial hemp," said Eric Steenstra, Executive Director of Vote Hemp, the nation's leading hemp grassroots advocacy organization working to revitalize industrial hemp production in the U.S. "This patriotic crop embodied in the hemp flag flying at the Capitol this Veterans Day is a powerful tool for economic development and restoring rural communities."  

 

"Growing Warriors is about strengthening the family farm and rural economies," added Lewis. "More than half of our military comes from rural farming communities. After serving our country they return home to find their town centers vacant and in disrepair. The land they defended can no longer provide for their families.  The Homegrown Flag project and the flag itself represents our nation's individual strengths, unity, diversity, ingenuity, and resilience. People working together to make something meaningful that will last, this is how the first farmer-veterans forged and tamed this brave new land. This is how we must move forward: by putting our veterans and our farmers in the lead. We are bringing back the past to move us all forward."

 

 More than half of U.S. states (27) have enacted or are considering laws to allow industrial hemp cultivation or are petitioning the federal government to declassify industrial hemp so it is no longer legally defined as a drug. A broad coalition of farmers, business owners, state and federal elected officials, policy makers, and citizens support the passage of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015.

 

The bill (H.R. 525 and S. 134) defines industrial hemp as having a THC concentration of 0.3 percent or 3/10 of 1% (a non-psychoactive amount), and would remove hemp from the Controlled Substances Act and allow all parts of the plant to be fully legal. On February 7, 2014, President Obama signed the Agriculture Act of 2014, the Farm Bill, into law. Section 7606 of the act, Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research, defines industrial hemp as distinct and authorizes institutions of higher education or state departments of agriculture in states where hemp is legal to grow hemp for research or agricultural pilot programs.

 

 About Industrial Hemp

Hemp is one of the oldest cultivated plants on earth dating back 12,000 years and a crop that has played a significant part in American history. The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution were drafted on hemp. U.S. Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams all grew hemp on their farms, along with most farmers during Colonial times. During World War II, hemp played a pivotal role supplying cordage for the U.S. Navy, including sturdy material for rope, rigging, anchor lines and sales.

 

Industrial hemp is a resilient crop that can be grown without pesticides and herbicides and is drought tolerant, requiring about 1/3 of the water needed to grow corn. The crop provides a versatile raw material that will support many U.S. industries including industrial textiles (e.g. rope, carpets, brake/clutch linings, automotive body parts and insulation for car doors), consumer textiles (e.g. apparel, shoes, fine fabrics, clothing accessories, linens and upholstery), paper (e.g. cardboard, printing paper, specialty paper), building material (e.g. fiberboard, cement, insulation for walls and ceilings), functional foods (e.g. hemp oil, hemp seeds, granola, protein powder, energy bars), industrial products (e.g. coatings, fuel, lubricants), personal hygiene and body products (e.g. soap, shampoo, cosmetics and topical salves).

 

Resources

 

More about Mike Lewis and the Growing Warriors Project at:

Heroic Endeavors: Growing Warriors and the American Hemp Flag

 

The Kentucky Cloth Project, 5-minute video about Mike Lewis and the Kentucky hemp and natural fibers used to make the American Hemp Flag.

 

About the Growing Warriors Project

Growing Warriors trains, assists, and equips veteran families with the skills, tools, and supplies needed to grow high quality sustainably produced local produce for their families, their communities, and their country. Growing Warriors operates six local food operations in Kentucky.

 

About Freedom Seed and Feed, Inc.

Freedom Seed and Feed is an agricultural enterprise production and processing company. The team partners with existing manufactures to research and develop scale appropriate processing based on the regionally needs of regional small and mid scale farmers and collaborative farm enterprises to access key markets, such as post-tobacco agricultural community revitalization efforts in the Southeast. 

 Industries served include industrial hemp for fiber, paper, textiles, building material, and nutritious food. 

Check out the newest commercial featuring St. Catharine College.

Light Up St. Catharine

The public is invited to attend the St. Catharine College campus on Dec. 1 at 5:30 p.m. for Light Up St. Catharine, a free event for people of all ages.

Start the holiday season at the Emily W. Hundley Library with a Christmas tree lighting, pictures with Santa, cookies and hot chocolate.

For more information, please call Katrina at (859) 336-5082. 

Tibetan monks from the Tashi Kyil Monastery in Dehra Dun, India will be hosting a traditional Tibetan dinner at St. Catharine on Monday, Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. in the Spalding Student & Community Center. 
The dinner will include a presentation on Tibetan history and culture, as well as the performance of a traditional Tibetan dance. 
The dinner will serve as an introduction of the Tashi Kyil monks to the St. Catharine community. The monks will return in the spring semester. From January 25 -29, the monks will construct a Peace Sand Mandala in the Emily W. Hundley Library. 
For more information about the dinner, contact Matt Branstetter at mbranstetter@sccky.edu.
St. Catharine College will host a series of strategic planning forums in Nelson, Marion and Washington counties. 
These forums are open to the public. 
The Nelson County forum is scheduled for Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. at the Maywood reception room. 
The Marion County forum will take place on Nov. 10 at 6:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Building at Centre Square in the large conference room on the second floor. 
Finally, the Washington County forum will occur on Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m. at St. Catharine College in room 301 of the Emily W. Hundley Library. 
For more information, please contact Margaret Hockensmith at mhockensmith@sccky.edu or (859) 336-5082, ext. 1098.
St. Catharine College students will have two opportunities to attend a forum with President Cindy Gnadinger regarding strategic planning. 
The first forum is set for Thursday, Nov. 5 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Pettus Auditorium. 
The second forum is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Pettus Auditorium. 
For more information, please contact Margaret Hockensmith at mhockensmith@sccky.edu.
St. Catharine College is looking for student volunteers to join a team of faculty and staff to present a short project in January on one of the three final topics for the college's next Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP). Topics include experiential learning / internships and career development, technology to enhance student learning, and sustainability. 
Students interested in volunteering may email Margaret Hockensmith at mhockensmith@sccky.edu by Nov. 13.

ST. CATHARINE, Ky. -- St. Catharine College installed Dr. Cindy Gnadinger as its eighth president on Friday, Oct. 23, in St. Catharine Hall.

Gnadinger, who became president in July of 2015, has accomplished much in her short time in office. Some notable achievements include appointing Laura Pantano as vice president for student affairs, expanding dining hours and meal options for students and increasing student activities and facilities.  

"In your short time as president, you've shown willingness to work with the students to make campus life even better," Kameron Lackey, student representative at the inauguration ceremony, said. "For that, we all thank you."

John Turner, the St. Catharine College board of trustees chairperson, presented Gnadinger with the chain of office during the inauguration ceremony.

"The weight of the chain is a reminder of the heavy responsibilities that must be willingly carried by all who occupy positions of leadership," Turner said.

Leadership from the Dominican Sisters of Peace, who sponsor St. Catharine College, was on hand for the inauguration. Sr. Pat Twohill, O.P., prioress of the order, gave remarks at the inauguration Mass.

"You stand in a long line of courageous Dominican women. And their spirit, like a mantle, rests on your shoulders today," Twohill said. "You follow in their footsteps. And you bring with you to this campus an enthusiastic, infectious, 'can-do' attitude; an inclusive approach to leadership--leadership that empowers others, and that is 'results' driven. You also bring keen intuition and flexibility which distinguish you as a leader and will allow you to guide St. Catharine College into the future."

 

During her address, Gnadinger focused on a theme of sustaining the future of St. Catharine College.

 

Gnadinger said sustainability will be a focus in two main ways: the viability of the college and the environmental philosophy and impact of the institution.

 

"Our sisters, the Dominican Sisters of Peace, recently affirmed their chapter commitments. Among those was the commitment to advocate and support policies and decisions to reduce the impact of global climate change," Gnadinger said. "We at St. Catharine College also commit to do our part to care for our common home. We will incorporate sustainable practices in our daily life and intentionally embed these ideas in our curriculum--because education is indeed our most powerful tool.  It's not enough to simply make curricular changes- we must live by example and engage our students in living sustainably during their time with us."

 

Those changes are already underway, Gnadinger said.

 

"Some changes have already taken place -- limiting waste in our dining halls by replacing disposable items with reusable ones. In the future, we will enhance these efforts and build on them. From a bike-share program to composting. From working with our city officials to develop bike lanes into town to establishing new academic programs that emphasize sustainability and conservation," Gnadinger said.

 

The work will be difficult, but necessary, she said.

 

"There is much to do," she said. "We don't anticipate it will always be easy. We've had many challenges through the years at St. Catharine, and we are sure to encounter more, but we won't stop because the work we do is too important."

 

An original composition by Teresa Tedder, artist-in-residence at St. Catharine College, premiered during the inauguration ceremony. Titled "Wellspring of Promise," the piece was composed as a gift to Gnadinger on the occasion of her inauguration.

 

The inauguration ceremony was the conclusion of a weeklong schedule of events, which included events such as the blessing of the campus farm, a day of service in the community, and several other community-wide activities.

 

Gnadinger began her appointment at St. Catharine College in 2014 as Provost.  Prior to that position, she served as Vice President for Academic Affairs at William Peace University. Preceding her appointment at William Peace, she served as Assistant Vice President, Dean of the School of Education, Director of Graduate Programs in Education, and a faculty member at Bellarmine University from 2000-2013. A former Fulbright Scholar, Dr. Gnadinger's research and publications focus on the teaching and learning process in both P-12 and higher education settings.

 

Dr. Gnadinger earned her Master's and Doctoral degrees from the University of Louisville with an emphasis in Literacy Teaching and Learning. She holds a B.S degree in Elementary Education from Western Kentucky University. Dr. Gnadinger has been an active member in her community with service on various committees and boards. Most importantly, she and her husband, John, have been married for 25 years. They have three sons: Luke, Dean, and Kyle and a Bichon Frise named Truman.

St. Catharine, KY-- On Monday, October 19, St. Catharine College (SCC) hosted nearly seventy people from the community and college for a ceremony to bless and christen its new educational site for the Berry Farming Program (BFP): Homeplace Farm.

 

The event featured a ceremony in which Sr. Mary Brigid Gregory and Jonah Hays Lucas (son of BFP professor Dr. Shawn Lucas) combined and scattered on the ground soils from the five Dominican Sisters of Peace farms and ecological education centers:

Heartland Farm (Pawnee Rock, KS)

Crystal Springs Earth Learning Center (Plainville, MA)

Crown Point Ecology Center (Bath, OH)

Shepherd's Corner Farm and Ecology Center (Blacklick, OH)

St. Catharine Farm (St. Catharine, KY).

BFP students Hannah Spaulding and Sathya Govindasamy combined and sprinkled water from the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes in France and water from Cartwright Creek, which flows through the St. Catharine Farm. Additionally, New York State farmer and writer Kristin Kimball read the poem "A Vision" by Wendell Berry. Kimball was visiting SCC to speak about her memoir The Dirty Life, which was the common reader for SCC freshmen. Springfield resident Elaine Simms and the SCC Fine Arts Committee for hosted a beautiful reception after the ceremony.

 

This event was part of the week-long celebration of the inauguration of St. Catharine College President, Dr. Cindy Gnadinger, whose installation took place in St. Catharine Hall on Friday, October 23. Event organizers Sr. Mary Louise Edwards, Berry Farming Program Coordinator Dr. Leah Bayens, and SCC Compliance Director Jared Burton express their gratitude to Sr. Terry Wasinger and St. Catharine Farm Manager Danny Ray Spalding for collecting soil and water samples. They are equally grateful to the St. Catharine Motherhouse for providing dinner after the ceremony for Kimball and representatives from The Berry Center: Mary Berry, Katie Ellis, and Mary Jane Yates.

 

The Berry Farming Program (BFP) offers undergraduate degrees in sustainable agriculture and local food systems development. The curriculum is grounded in the lifework of Kentucky farmer and writer Wendell Berry. The campus farm serves as a hands-on training and research facility for SCC students and the community.
Check out these photos from Dr. Cindy Gnadinger's inauguration.

Two brothers, both students at St. Catharine College, will perform on the Kentucky Farm Bureau Main Stage on Friday, Oct. 2, during the Springfield - Washington County Sorghum Festival.

The Coslow brothers, Jon-Michael and Logan, will take the stage at 6 p.m. Jon-Michael took a few moments from him busy schedule to answer a few questions about the band.

How long have you guys been playing together?

Me and my brother Logan have been playing bluegrass music for over 10 years. Our band has been together for close to five years, but has had many different configurations during that time. 

What year are you at St. Catharine and what are your majors?

I am a senior here at St. Catharine and my major is natural science. Logan is junior and his major is biology. 

Have you ever played the Sorghum Festival before?

Yes. We have competed in the band competition and individual talent competition at the Sorghum Festival before.

Do you guys typically play at festivals and other venues? If so, where are some of the places you've played?

Yes. We typically play a wide variety of venues such as festivals, churches, weddings, parties, and other various major events. Some of the places we have played include the Vine Grove Bluegrass Festival, Russell Springs Bluegrass Festival, the annual Bardstown Bluegrass Festival, and Springfield's River of Life Church. 

Is there anything else you'd like to add?

We focus on playing traditional bluegrass and bluegrass gospel music. It is something that we have been doing for many years and is a big part of our lives and what makes us, us. We plan on continuing for many years to come. 

Dr. Tara Tuttle was recently published in the latest issue of Studies in Popular Culture, a journal of the Popular Culture Association.  This journal publishes articles on popular culture mediated through film, literature, radio, television, music, graphics, print, practices, associations, or events--any of the material or conceptual conditions of life.  In her article, Dr. Tuttle analyzed the construction of country music authenticity in the recent memoir Like Me:  Confessions of a Heartland Country Singer published by country star and LGBTQ rights advocate Chely Wright.  Wright's widely-covered public disclosure of her sexual identity disrupted the hegemonic ideal of heterosexuality infrequently challenged in country music.  Tuttle argues that in her memoir, Wright strives to persuade readers, skeptics, and fans that Wright fits the classic narrative of country music authenticity despite her revelation, but that the industry shut Wright out following her public announcement by eliminating radio play of her songs, failing to invite her to industry events, and drastically reducing the media coverage she received when she was perceived as heterosexual.

Announcement

 

The St. Catharine College Department of Nursing wishes to announce that it will host a site review for continuing accreditation of its Associates Degree Program of Nursing by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

 

You are invited to meet the site visit team and share your comments about the program in person at a meeting scheduled at 3pm on September 30 in the

Lay Conference Room in the Emily W. Hundley Library, St. Catharine College.

 

Written comments are also welcome and should be submitted directly to:

 

Dr. Marsal Stoll, Chief Executive Officer

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing

3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850

Atlanta, GA 30326

Or e-mail: mstoll@acenursing.org

 

All written comments should be received by the ACEN by

September 24, 2015. 

All incoming freshmen attended one of nine Green Dot sessions last month led by St. Catharine College's  Green Dot Institute trained instructor, Dr. Tara Tuttle.  A tenth session was also available for interested upperclassmen.  Green Dot is an interactive, skill-building bystander intervention training program that asks participants to imagine themselves in hypothetical scenarios likely to occur in and around campus.  Green Dot examines multiple kinds of power-based personal violence, including sexual violence and harassment, intimate partner violence, stalking, and gender or other identity-based targeting.  Our goal  in implementing Green Dot at Saint Catharine College is to create a new set of norms that mobilize bystanders to recognize and help prevent any form of violence in our St. Catharine College community in ways that are easy, safe, and manageable.  The goals of Green Dot overlap with our Dominican pillar of community in asking us to consider ways to look out for and take care of each other.  Our choices and actions make a difference, and the Green Dot approach stresses that everyone is responsible for making our community safer.  Many bystanders do nothing when they encounter a situation that appears as if it may escalate into some kind of harm or danger, but Green Dot training provides the skills to move from doing nothing to doing something.  That something is what a Green Dot is, a small, individualized action that helps reduce the likelihood of violence.

St. Catharine College will host Family Day on Saturday, Oct. 3. 
Guests will have the opportunity to walk the Dominican Mile, attend a women's soccer game against St. Mary of the Woods College, enjoy a continental breakfast and take a shuttle ride to downtown Springfield for the Sorghum Festival.

Last spring, St. Catharine College and FiveStar convenience stores announced a partnership that would keep college costs affordable and help students reach their educational goals.

This fall semester at St. Catharine College, more than 40 students have benefitted from that partnership with FiveStar convenience stores. Every new, first-time, full-time student who lives at home and commutes daily to campus received a $250 FiveStar card. Those same students will receive another $250 card in January to help with their spring semester expenses.

"St. Catharine College is pleased to partner with FiveStar in this unique way that benefits our commuter students," St. Catharine College President Dr. Cindy Gnadinger said. "Making college affordable for our students is one of our ongoing commitments."

According to Laura Blair, public relations manager at Newcomb Oil Co., the gift cards can be redeemed for gasoline or any other items sold at any of the 76 FiveStar convenience store locations in the state.

Students from Bardstown, Lexington, Danville and many other locations in the region were recipients of the incentive. 

St. Catharine College professor Becky Lee Meadows, Ph.D., was recently published in an academic journal at the University of Zululand in South Africa.

Meadows wrote "an analysis of Edgar Allan Poe's diary entries in relation to his writings, and (the piece) focuses upon the idea that Poe suffered from bipolar disorder, and that, along with depression, led to the 'return of the dead' in so many of his works," Meadows said.

The paper appeared in the recent edition of Inkanyiso: The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. To view the journal online, go to www.inkanyiso.uzulu.ac.za

Over the past 24 years of hosting the celebrity golf classic, officials at St. Catharine College had incredible luck with weather conditions. However, Tropical Storm Bill changed that long streak of luck and made sure the 25th year was memorable.

Players endured a three-hour rain delay to tee it up for St. Catharine College students. At the end of the day, six teams took home high honors.

The team earning first-place, low net was INOAC #1. The Joe Jones team earned first-place, low gross.

Earning second-place, low net was the team from Hassco / Beechfork. Second-place low gross honors went to the Snappy Tomato team.

Third-place low net belonged to the Sell with Hale team, while third-place low gross was claimed by the RAME Construction team.

Thank you to all who supported our Patriots!

As members of the NAIA, and the Mid-South Conference for just eight years, the St. Catharine College athletic program is still the new kid on the block. But the Patriots have continued to improve and enjoyed what will be termed their most successful year to date in the 2014-2015 campaign.

            While the Patriots will not actually unfurl any championship banners, they can reflect on  many accomplishments, both athletically and academically. Three teams came within a game of the school's first MSC tournament title as the men's soccer, softball and baseball teams were all runner-up the past season. The baseball team and the soccer team also finished in second place during the regular season.

            Due to the teams' successes, honors were garnered by the coaches of the Patriot teams. Women's golf coach Joan Rizer was named Mid-South Conference Coach of the Year as was Tim Wolz in men's soccer and Luther Bramblett in baseball. Wolz also was honored as the Southeast Region Coach of the year. 

            St. Catharine College athletes also enjoyed the best year in the school's history in accumulating dozens of Mid-South Conference honors. Player of the Week awards were sent St. Catharine's way 24 times during 2014-2015. Senior right-hander John Werner was named MSC Pitcher of the Week five times and senior goalkeeper C.J. Powell was men's soccer Defensive Player of the Week five times.

            Further Mid-South Conference recognition went to three Patriots for stellar performances throughout an entire season. Werner was named Pitcher of the Year in the MSC, Jodie Klein won the volleyball Libero (defensive specialist) of the Year and Ashley Woods was men's soccer Player of the Year.

            Thirty-three Patriots were named to first and second team All Mid-South Conference teams. Three baseball players (Alfredo Bohorquez - second base, Drew Kissel - catcher, Harold Diaz - outfield) received the MSC Gold Glove award for defensive excellence.

            The biggest post-season news for the Bat Pats came days ago when John Werner, the senior right-hander from Anaheim, Calif., was selected in the Major League draft by the Texas Rangers. Werner is the fifth Patriot player to be selected in the Major league draft and the 17th player who will play at some level of professional baseball.   

            Patriot teams also drew national attention as four teams (baseball, wrestling, men's soccer and volleyball) received votes for the NAIA top 25 at some point during their respective seasons. Individuals were also recognized nationally as Steven Borkowski was the NAIA National Pitcher of the Week and B.J. Carman was named NAIA National Wrestler of the Week. Jordan Strickland (volleyball) was third team NAIA All-American while her teammate Rebecca Just was NAIA All-American Honorable Mention as was Ashley Woods in soccer. Three wrestlers, Carman, Mike Clark and Andy Lenz, made it to the NAIA National Tournament in the first year St. Catharine has fielded a wrestling team.

            While the list of awards for performances on the field is impressive, the year just completed was also a winner outside the lines. A total of 62 Patriot athletes were named Academic All Mid-South Conference. Twenty-two of those were also named Daktronics Scholar Athletes which recognizes academic achievements on the national level. Those individual academic awards led to the best year for teams overall as student/athletes achieved the highest grade point average since St. Catharine joined the NAIA.    Fifteen of the 21 athletic teams were above a 3.0 GPA during the last academic year.

            Recognition also came to St. Catharine in the NAIA program titled Champions of Character which encompasses five core values of integrity, respect, responsibility, sportsmanship and servant leadership.  St. Catharine again received the distinction of a Champion of Character institution by meeting certain criteria.

            And, what can be considered the highest honor of all came just last week at the spring meeting of the Mid-South Conference. Kelsey Brooks, a senior from Bloomfield, Ky. who played second base on the softball team, was awarded the Character First award. Earlier in the softball season Brooks received the MSC Champion of Character award. That award went to one recipient from each of the 10 female sports sponsored by the conference. That pool of ten individuals was then considered for the Character First award that was voted on by the athletic directors.

            "That is quite an honor for Kelsey and a great reflection on her personal character," said St. Catharine athletic director Tom Bystrek.

            Bystrek added, "We are proud of her and our entire athletic department for what has been accomplished. The championships will no doubt come soon but it is good to see that in the meantime our student athletes have excelled in many areas both on and off the field."

ST. CATHARINE, KY.,June 12, 2015 - Dr. Cindy Meyers Gnadinger, currently serving as provost at St. Catharine College, has been selected to serve as the eighth president of St. Catharine College, effective July 1.

Gnadinger, who earned a doctorate of education in supervision of instruction from University of Louisville, will succeed William D. Huston at the liberal arts institution in St. Catharine, Ky. Huston was named president in 1997. He announced his retirement in February after serving 18 years as the college president.

"I am enthusiastic about the credentials and energy Dr. Gnadinger brings to St. Catharine College. In particular, her academic background and appreciation of the Dominican charism are aligned with the mission of the college," said John Turner, chairman of St. Catharine College's Board of Trustees.

Gnadinger joined St. Catharine College in June 2014 as vice president for academic affairs. She was quickly promoted to provost, with responsibilities including overseeing faculty, academic programs, accreditation, the Emily W. Hundley Library, the Office of Student Success, the Office of the Registrar, the Office of Admissions and the Financial Aid Office.

Prior to joining the St. Catharine College administration, Gnadinger served as vice president for academic affairs at William Peace University in Raleigh, North Carolina, and as assistant vice president for academic affairs at Bellarmine University in Louisville.

Gnadinger spent 13 years at Bellarmine University, serving as a professor, department chair, dean and assistant vice president for academic affairs.

While at Bellarmine, she led the development of four new graduate degree programs, coordinated formal outreach initiatives to community agencies and established the Bellarmine Center for Teaching, Excellence, and Leadership.

"With a background of building strong academic programs of excellence, Dr. Gnadinger is the perfect architect to better posture St. Catharine College for a more competitive and successful level of achievement in the future," said William D. Huston, current St. Catharine College president. "She is undoubtedly the person that can take us to the next level for continued success in an extremely competitive higher education environment."

Gnadinger is also a Fulbright Scholar with research interests that include the teaching and learning processes in P-12 and higher education settings. She also brings experience in seeking external funds, with her efforts resulting in the procurement of approximately $3 million in contributions.

Besides holding former faculty and administration roles, Gnadinger was selected for the Council on Independent Colleges' (CIC) Senior Leadership Academy, a "yearlong program designed to assist in filling the gap in the current leadership pipeline by continuing the preparation of leaders who show promise of developing the talents and skills needed to succeed in a senior leadership position on campus. The Senior Leadership Academy also helps participants obtain a better understanding of the broader context within which their own institution operates and a perspective on higher education beyond their current role," according to the CIC website.

Other achievements in her career include expansion of academic programs at both William Peace University and Bellarmine University. At Bellarmine, she also led the establishment of the Office of Sponsored Projects and enhanced faculty development opportunities including the Spotlight Series, a monthly professional development workshop series, and an iPad faculty-learning community.

"Dr. Gnadinger comes with proven higher administrative experience, which well-equip her to be the president of St. Catharine College," said Sr. Maria Ciriello, St. Catharine College trustee and executive committee member. "Dr. Gnadinger's passion for the future of the college and her concern for students will drive all her endeavors."

Ciriello also noted that Gnadinger's new ideas, energy and enthusiasm will light up the campus.

Sr. Margaret Ormond, prioress of the Dominican Sisters of Peace, also expressed confidence in Gnadinger's ability to lead.

"As Dominican Sisters and Associates of Peace, we claim our charism to preach truth through education and care for the earth," Ormond said. "We have done this at St. Catharine since 1822. We know that Dr. Cindy Gnadinger will honor this tradition as the president of St. Catharine College. We welcome her leadership, her energy and her love for St. Catharine College. We hope that she will join us in unfolding a future full of hope. She will have our prayer and our support."

Len Spalding, a St. Catharine College trustee and benefactor, sees a long career ahead for Gnadinger at the college.

"St. Catharine College is particularly fortunate to have Dr. Gnadinger as Bill Huston's successor," Spalding said. "Her background in higher education circles prepares her for the tasks associated with leading the college in the next stage of its growth. Her passion for St. Catharine College and her abundant energy will serve the school well over the next 15 years or so. Speaking as a trustee, Dr. Gnadinger has shared some of her vision and goals for the college and we are all 100 percent behind her and eager to help her in any way possible."

Bill Tatum, St. Catharine College trustee and presidential search committee chairman, said Gnadinger was a clear choice as the next president.

"I believe Dr. Gnadinger will be an exceptional president who has all the tools necessary to continue the college's growth," Tatum said. "We were fortunate to have someone with her experience and skill set on staff to assure a seamless transition."

Gnadinger said she looks forward to leading St. Catharine College into the future.

"I am honored to serve as the eighth president of St. Catharine College," she said. "I look forward to building on the strong foundation that has been established at this historic institution. I am grateful to the Board of Trustees and the Dominican Sisters of Peace for the confidence they have placed in my leadership. The Dominican pillars of prayer, study, ministry, and community make St. Catharine an ideal place for me to continue my work with faculty, staff, and students. I am eager to get started and look forward to working with our community to enhance the impact of our college."

The new president will feel right at home on campus, Ciriello said, as Gnadinger is a native of nearby Bullitt County. She and her husband, John, currently reside in Fisherville. She and her husband have three sons; Luke, Dean and Kyle.   

Founded in the Dominican tradition in 1931 and sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Peace, St. Catharine College, a Catholic Dominican college inspired by its founders, welcomes all to the challenging pursuit of truth, preparing them to become critical thinkers, ethical leaders and engaged citizens.

St. Catharine College Professor of Criminal Justice and Sociology Dr. Harry Toder recently published an opinion piece in The Springfield Sun. The editorial gives advice to recent graduates. 
Toder's editorial was published in the May _, 2015 edition of The Springfield Sun. The online version of the review can be found here. The Springfield Sun content is behind a paywall, which requires first paying a subscription fee to view the story. Printed copies of the newspaper can be found in the Emily W. Hundley Library on campus.
St. Catharine College's Dean of the Graduate School, Sr. Mary Angela Shaughnessy, recently received the 2015 Trinity Peace Medal. 
Trinity High School announced the honor during its commencement ceremony recently.
St. Catharine College is proud to announce that Narayan Abbi, Emily Appelhaus, Ashley Apple, Mariah Ballard, Joshua Barlow, Felipe Barrientos, Cody Beasley, David Bell, Sarah Blair, Leslie Blair, Matthew Bloom, Carol Boone, Charles Bowen, Lauren Bowling, Crystal Brady, Nicholas Brawner, Kelsey Brooks, Anna Burdette, Brent Cain, Machera Calhoun, Krystal Cammuse, Chris Cantino, Winifred Cheuvront, Cassie Clark, Corey Claunch, Kayla Cocanougher, Joy Coppage, Courtney Corey, Craig Cox, Addison Crawford, Audrianna Culver, Christina Day, Courtney Deaton, Victoria Delk, Alisha Dierdorff, Melanie Draper, Porsha Ellison, Casey Elmore, Randi Fields, Mindi Fortner, Kimberly Fulkerson, Kristen Fulkerson, Adrian Garcia, Joan Gardner, Lacy Gilley, Miranda Goff, Haley Gorley, Luzelenia Grant, Lucia Guthrie, Anna Hamilton, Russell Hardin, Morgan Hardin, Katrina Haydon, Jordan Hayes, Kelly Hays, Kayla Hazelip, Emmanuel Hernandez, Zackery Hilbert, Rianne Hofstraat, Brandi Hood, Mariah House, Brandon Huffman, Patrick Hyde, Drew Ison, Katie Jerome, Lauren Johnston, Laura Jones, Jarred Keck, Michael Killion, Andrea King, Heather Knopp, Samuel Kpoh, Ryan Kute, Victoria Lawson, Cassandra Lawton, Hannah Lee, Romeo Lewis, Linda Libby, Paige Long, Morgan Ludwig, Doreen Makamba, Marc Mason, Brooklyn Masterson, Allison Mattingly, Ann Mattingly, Courtney Mattingly, Emily McCombs, Donovan McCutcheon, Janay McLain, Taylor McNutt, Samuel Miles, Raymond Mkandama, Michael Moreland, Nadezhda Moshonchuk, Madonna Mosser, Khalil Murphy, Andrew Nelson, Brooke Newton, Jennarae Niece, Kathi O'Neal, Kevin Owens, Karin Parrent, Brooke Pearson, Nicole Peterson, Laura Pomerleau, Candace Price, Kelsie Pulliam, Martha Raley, Lindsey Rogers, Nicolas Rosso, Shelby Salinas, Heather Sandlin, Samantha Seger, Jacob Settles, Stacie Shrout, Chelsey Sievert, Alexandra Southard, Chase Spalding, Joseph Spalding, Britton Spears, Sheryl Spurlock, Casey Stone, April Stratton, Christina Summers, Lance Taylor, Tyson Thompson, Shelbi Thornhill, Holly Thrasher, William Tolefree, Eric Walker, Mary Watson, Nicole Wheatley, Chelsea Wichman, Terrance Withers, Chelsie Wolf, Ashley Woods and Megan Wyatt  have completed all coursework required for graduation.

One of St. Catharine College's program coordinators recently received a radiologic sciences scholarship.

 

April Bowman, radiography program coordinator of clinical education at St. Catharine College, has been awarded the Radiologic Sciences Educator Scholarship by the ASRT Foundation for the 2015-2016 academic year.

 

The $5,000 scholarship will help Bowman complete a Master of Arts in Leadership educational program at St. Catharine College. This scholarship is made possible by generous donations to the ASRT Foundation.

 

"We are happy to provide April with financial support to get the tools she needs to further her education and career," said Phelosha Collaros, ASRT Foundation's director. "The scholarship is a testament to the commitment and collaborative spirit of the radiologic technology community."

 

To be eligible, applicants must be educators who are pursuing their bachelor's, master's or doctoral degree to enhance their position as a program director, faculty member, clinical coordinator or clinical instructor.

 

Scholarship recipients submitted applications and were selected based on evidence of commitment, leadership, achievement and financial need. The Foundation's Scholarship Review Committee evaluated scholarship applications and provided recommendations to the Board of Trustees. Recipients were then approved by the Board of Trustees.

 

To learn more about scholarship programs, including eligibility requirements and application information, and for more information about the ASRT Foundation, visit www.asrtfoundation.org.
In honor of his upcoming retirement, friends, colleagues and benefactors recounted some of the highlights of his 18-year career at St. Catharine College.

Hundreds gathered in the Emily W. Hundley Library on the campus of St. Catharine College on May 20 to celebrate the career of William D. Huston as president of the college. Huston served 18 years in the position and will retire from the presidency at the end of June. He received an honorary doctorate from the college, a blessing sent from the Pope, a blessing from the Dominican Sisters of Peace and many words of well wishes during his retirement reception. 

Hundreds gathered in the Emily W. Hundley Library on the campus of St. Catharine College on May 20 to celebrate the career of William D. Huston as president of the college. Huston served 18 years in the position and will retire from the presidency at the end of June. He received an honorary doctorate from the college, a blessing sent from the Pope, a blessing from the Dominican Sisters of Peace and many words of well wishes during his retirement reception. 

St. Catharine College recently announced the list of students who have achieved extraordinary academic success for the spring 2015 semester.

The dean's list includes all students who had a grade point average of 3.6 - 3.999.
The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Sebastian Barrientos, Casey Baryla, Cody Beasley, Emily Belt, Matthew Bloom, Heather Brabon, Crystal Brady, Max Bristow, Madison Bruce, Anna Burdette, Shakera Butler, Chris Cantino, Ann Chastain, Winifred Cheuvront, Michael Clark, Amanda Conrad, Alysa Coomes, Rachel Cox, Kourtney Current, Courtney Deaton, Victoria Delk, Alisha Dierdorff, Thaddeus Dodge, Lauren Downs, Casey Elmore, Emily Fenwick, Wendy Fowler, Katelyn Garland, Amanda Garrett, Kelsey Givens, Ci'Vaughn Green, Courtney Hagedorn, Morgan Hardin, Jordan Hayes, John Higdon, Sadie Hill, Ashley Holladay, Mariah House, Drew Ison, Christian Johnson, Lauren Johnston, Ruth Kayembe, Ivan Kerkoc Portillo, Harry Kirwan, Jessica Klefot, Alexander Knowles, Cody Kollenberg, Khamsing Kosanouvong, Ryan Kute, Daniel Lerma, Michael Lewis, Emily McCombs, Jacob McCoy, Janay McLain, Logan Medley, Kindsay Miller-Riney, Christina Mudd, Miranda Nalley, Andrew Nelson, Brooke Newton, Kathi O'Neal, Brandyn Pemberton, Candace Price, Kelsie Pulliam, Alexandrea Richards, Crystal Riley, Taylor Ritchie, Allyson Rowland, Mitch Rusch, Nicole Schowalter, Amanda Schultz, Taylor Smith, Shelby Spalding, Chase Spalding, Joseph Spalding, Kristan Spurling, Amber Thorpe, Holly Thrasher, Sie Tioye, Rodney Vuick, Tiffany Webb, Kalyn Weddle, Mary Welch, Crystal Welcher, Michael Wiley, Kayla Wilson, Miranda Wilson, Hannah Wolf, Meghan Wolford and Brianna Wright.

The president's list includes all students who completed 12 college-level credit hours and maintained a perfect 4.0 grade point average. The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Courtney Anderson, David Bell, Emily Bishop, Rebecca Brady, Kelsey Brooks, Dylan Brown, Cynthia Cavazos, Annissa Chesser, Porshia Clark, Sarah Colvin, Claudia Cook, Mary Ezaizat, Randi Fields, Robert Giles, Kelsey Givens, Ramie Goldey, Sarah Goode, Shelby Gray, Michael Hardin, Nora Hardin, Derrick Hardison, Sarah Haydon, Joseph Hayes, Kelly Hays, Alisha Heady, Katie Jerome, Rebecca Just, Kathleen Lance, Amelia Mattingly, Macy McFall, Jacob Miles, Daphne Moore, Patricia Moyer, Jennarae Niece, Karin Parrent, Brooke Pearson, Sally Rios, Shelby Rush, Stacey Ryan, Katherine Simpson, Britney Smith, Hannah Spaulding, Lance Taylor, Kelli Volenski, Eric Walker, Marvin Wesselburg, Chelsea Wichman and Emily Zubricky. 

St. Catharine College recently announced the list of students who have achieved extraordinary academic success for the spring 2015 semester.

The dean's list includes all students who had a grade point average of 3.6 - 3.999.
The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Sebastian Barrientos, Casey Baryla, Cody Beasley, Emily Belt, Matthew Bloom, Heather Brabon, Crystal Brady, Max Bristow, Madison Bruce, Anna Burdette, Shakera Butler, Chris Cantino, Ann Chastain, Winifred Cheuvront, Michael Clark, Amanda Conrad, Alysa Coomes, Rachel Cox, Kourtney Current, Courtney Deaton, Victoria Delk, Alisha Dierdorff, Thaddeus Dodge, Lauren Downs, Casey Elmore, Emily Fenwick, Wendy Fowler, Katelyn Garland, Amanda Garrett, Kelsey Givens, Ci'Vaughn Green, Courtney Hagedorn, Morgan Hardin, Jordan Hayes, John Higdon, Sadie Hill, Ashley Holladay, Mariah House, Drew Ison, Christian Johnson, Lauren Johnston, Ruth Kayembe, Ivan Kerkoc Portillo, Harry Kirwan, Jessica Klefot, Alexander Knowles, Cody Kollenberg, Khamsing Kosanouvong, Ryan Kute, Daniel Lerma, Michael Lewis, Emily McCombs, Jacob McCoy, Janay McLain, Logan Medley, Kindsay Miller-Riney, Christina Mudd, Miranda Nalley, Andrew Nelson, Brooke Newton, Kathi O'Neal, Brandyn Pemberton, Candace Price, Kelsie Pulliam, Alexandrea Richards, Crystal Riley, Taylor Ritchie, Allyson Rowland, Mitch Rusch, Nicole Schowalter, Amanda Schultz, Taylor Smith, Shelby Spalding, Chase Spalding, Joseph Spalding, Kristan Spurling, Amber Thorpe, Holly Thrasher, Sie Tioye, Rodney Vuick, Tiffany Webb, Kalyn Weddle, Mary Welch, Crystal Welcher, Michael Wiley, Kayla Wilson, Miranda Wilson, Hannah Wolf, Meghan Wolford and Brianna Wright.

The president's list includes all students who completed 12 college-level credit hours and maintained a perfect 4.0 grade point average. The following students were recognized for their academic achievement: Courtney Anderson, David Bell, Emily Bishop, Rebecca Brady, Kelsey Brooks, Dylan Brown, Cynthia Cavazos, Annissa Chesser, Porshia Clark, Sarah Colvin, Claudia Cook, Mary Ezaizat, Randi Fields, Robert Giles, Kelsey Givens, Ramie Goldey, Sarah Goode, Shelby Gray, Michael Hardin, Nora Hardin, Derrick Hardison, Sarah Haydon, Joseph Hayes, Kelly Hays, Alisha Heady, Katie Jerome, Rebecca Just, Kathleen Lance, Amelia Mattingly, Macy McFall, Jacob Miles, Daphne Moore, Patricia Moyer, Jennarae Niece, Karin Parrent, Brooke Pearson, Sally Rios, Shelby Rush, Stacey Ryan, Katherine Simpson, Britney Smith, Hannah Spaulding, Lance Taylor, Kelli Volenski, Eric Walker, Marvin Wesselburg, Chelsea Wichman and Emily Zubricky.

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY - Matthew Gaddie, a Nelson County artist and adjunct professor at St. Catharine College, has been commissioned by the Kentucky Arts Council to design and create the 2016 Governor's Awards in the Arts. Gaddie is an adjunct professor of art at St. Catharine College in Springfield. The commission was awarded based on a series of large ceramic platters Gaddie created in 2014. The 10 new pieces will each have an individual color pallet, but will reflect the unique aesthetic for which Gaddie has become nationally recognized. The wood-fired platters will reflect quiet moments of time on the rural landscapes of Kentucky. The most notable piece from the original series is entitled, "Sunrise on a Kentucky Cornfield."

The Governor's Awards are the Commonwealth's most prestigious arts awards honoring Kentucky individuals, businesses and organizations that make significant contributions to the arts in the state. Governor's Awards in the Arts recipients exemplify a diversity of accomplishments in all areas of the arts, as well as the irreplaceable value of those contributions to the state's communities, educational environment and economy. The combined achievements and contributions of this esteemed group of recipients demonstrate the many ways that citizens of Kentucky uphold the tradition of creating a rich cultural legacy.

As an artist producing works in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Gaddie believes that anything of real value takes time to create and to appreciate. His works are an attempt to reflect the ebb-and-flow of the simple life he grew to admire as a child. His work is primarily functional pottery, straightforward in form and intent. Inside the frame and philosophy of practicality is the struggle to communicate the underlying connection he sees between the rural, hard-working days of his youth and the life he now wants to live as a potter. The cyclical pattern of throwing, trimming, glazing and firing are comfortable for him. He is a farm-raised laborer who has wonderful memories of planting, weeding and harvesting. In the age of quick marts, high-speed connections, fast food and  one-stop shopping, he tries to live his life slowly and with purpose. In a time of mass-produced uniformity, he tries to create works that are unique, each piece having recorded its own tale of creation - a tale of struggles, of successes, of failures, of imperfections and of hopes...it is a human tale.

He is a 1999 graduate of Bardstown High School and was selected to attend the Governor School for the Arts in Visual Arts. He received a Bachelor's of Fine Arts with a focus on ceramics from University of Evansville in 2003, his master's degree in 2013 and will be completing his Master's of Fine Arts in ceramics from Hood College in the spring of 2016.

Matthew's exhibition record continues to grow rapidly and he has received national recognition for his ceramic vessels. In 2014, he received the prestigious award of Best in Show at Kentucky Crafted: The Market.

That same year, Matt was recognized as one of 100 of the most notable wood-fired potters worldwide in the book "Wood-Fired Ceramics - 100 Contemporary Artists." Recently his work was invited to be on display at the St. Petersburg's International Wood-Fired Pottery Invitational Exhibition.

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY - Matthew Gaddie, a Nelson County artist and adjunct professor at St. Catharine College, has been commissioned by the Kentucky Arts Council to design and create the 2016 Governor's Awards in the Arts. Gaddie is an adjunct professor of art at St. Catharine College in Springfield. The commission was awarded based on a series of large ceramic platters Gaddie created in 2014. The 10 new pieces will each have an individual color pallet, but will reflect the unique aesthetic for which Gaddie has become nationally recognized. The wood-fired platters will reflect quiet moments of time on the rural landscapes of Kentucky. The most notable piece from the original series is entitled, "Sunrise on a Kentucky Cornfield."

 

The Governor's Awards are the Commonwealth's most prestigious arts awards honoring Kentucky individuals, businesses and organizations that make significant contributions to the arts in the state. Governor's Awards in the Arts recipients exemplify a diversity of accomplishments in all areas of the arts, as well as the irreplaceable value of those contributions to the state's communities, educational environment and economy. The combined achievements and contributions of this esteemed group of recipients demonstrate the many ways that citizens of Kentucky uphold the tradition of creating a rich cultural legacy.

 

As an artist producing works in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Gaddie believes that anything of real value takes time to create and to appreciate. His works are an attempt to reflect the ebb-and-flow of the simple life he grew to admire as a child. His work is primarily functional pottery, straightforward in form and intent. Inside the frame and philosophy of practicality is the struggle to communicate the underlying connection he sees between the rural, hard-working days of his youth and the life he now wants to live as a potter. The cyclical pattern of throwing, trimming, glazing and firing are comfortable for him. He is a farm-raised laborer who has wonderful memories of planting, weeding and harvesting. In the age of quick marts, high-speed connections, fast food and  one-stop shopping, he tries to live his life slowly and with purpose. In a time of mass-produced uniformity, he tries to create works that are unique, each piece having recorded its own tale of creation - a tale of struggles, of successes, of failures, of imperfections and of hopes...it is a human tale.

 

He is a 1999 graduate of Bardstown High School and was selected to attend the Governor School for the Arts in Visual Arts. He received a Bachelor's of Fine Arts with a focus on ceramics from University of Evansville in 2003, his master's degree in 2013 and will be completing his Master's of Fine Arts in ceramics from Hood College in the spring of 2016.

 

Matthew's exhibition record continues to grow rapidly and he has received national recognition for his ceramic vessels. In 2014, he received the prestigious award of Best in Show at Kentucky Crafted: The Market.

That same year, Matt was recognized as one of 100 of the most notable wood-fired potters worldwide in the book "Wood-Fired Ceramics - 100 Contemporary Artists." Recently his work was invited to be on display at the St. Petersburg's International Wood-Fired Pottery Invitational Exhibition.

St. Catharine College will be honoring 18 years of service by SCC President William D. Huston on Wednesday, May 20 from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. in the Emily W. Hundley Library.

For more information or to RSVP, click here or call Kristen Bennett at (859) 336-7707.

The Parable of the Lost Shepherds

On a recent visit to my ancestral home in Nigeria, I was shocked to learn that the spirit of love and fellowship that held my big family together was no more. I could not believe it. To help you understand my shock, a brief background narrative is necessary.

I come from a reasonably large family--seven uncles and one aunt. My parents had eight of us.  My uncles and aunt made up for whatever shortfall they perceived by leaving my siblings and I with so many cousins that it was a burden keeping up with names. Add my nieces and nephews, and we were enough to start a modest village. Yet, we were close. The relationship was such that when I ran out of money in my final year at the university, an uncle sent me the life savings of his recently deceased son, even though he had other needs yearning for attention! This story will suffer serious injustice if I fail to mention thatdespite such commendable acts of charity,Christians of their time considered my family as heathen, just as many of us think of some groups today!

The above was the state of affairs when I left home for a prolonged sojourn overseas.  It was there that word reached me that my uncles, aunt, and cousins had, one-by-one, converted to the Christian faith.  Believing that each conversion came with enhanced sense of goodwill and the fellowship of the Spirit, I began to imagine that the bond of friendship we had thus far enjoyed would only multiply.  I could not wait to be part of a different experience far superior to what obtained when we were mostly 'lost heathens.'

Hence my shock when, upon arrival, I met a family in disarray, one in which no two families were actually on talking terms. Praying time was more like a war, and many could be heard openly asking for misfortune to befall others. So, what went wrong? Part of the answer was buried in the fact that each family unit went to a different church.  Almost without exception, these were new-age churches whose ministers seemed to have created the impression that they were the voices of God and were the only ones who could reach Him.  Equally disturbing, anyone with a problem ran to his or her 'minister prophet' whose 'prophecies' were considered infallible and absolute. These selected ones promptly inoculated members with very ruinous ideas. Specifically, many were quick to attribute problems to the evil machinations of witches and evil spirits. That wouldn't have been much of a problem had their accusing fingers not led straight to friends and family (spouses, parents, siblings, uncles, aunts, cousins, nephews, nieces, fellow church members, and colleagues)--they pointed at closest neighbors, the very ones whom God specifically asked His followers to love and adore! Yes, they pointed at our emotional sanctuary and cultural support structures, the very stability of the Church, family, and civil society.  No wonder the peace of the family went up in smoke, and the bond that held the village together stood little chance against the vengeful spirit that was unleashed. What remained was humongous debris in a sad and depressing void. Blind to the carnage, and definitely presiding over this gutted carcass, was a plethora of preachers who quoted the Bible from dawn to dusk, and taught their followers everything but the most important, the love of neighbor! As a result, many did the opposite; they hated their neighbors with a vengeance and made up allegations against innocent people. Hear them pray, and one realized that they took delight in binding and casting friends and relatives as if being close to them was a curse. Some go so far as to ask for the demise of others! Imagine what the world would have looked like had God indulged even a small fraction of those requests.

Lost in all these were the core elements of the Christian faith--love and charity, important virtues that would have made it second nature to those who follow the Prince of Peace to, at the least, leave peace along their trail.  And, of course, no one saw the paradox in the fact that there was more peace when the village was crawling with heathens than now that many carry posters heralding their born-again status.

This obvious aberration was by no means peculiar to my family or village.  Spurious allegations, including that of murder, turned out to be common in many parts of the country. The vogue was, and still is, to hang every death on someone's neck, or to insinuate an evil conspiracy by claiming that "our enemies have done their worst."  And the accusers have no reservations stretching the imagination to convince their audience that the alleged murders were not committed with conventional weapons (machete, clubs, guns, or good old poison) but rather through voodoo, juju as they call them there.

Really? Kill a Christian with voodoo? Will that not suggest that God was incapable of protecting His children from fetish contraptions? Wouldn't that imply that the Devil or even native doctors (the voodoo makers) are more powerful than God? Shouldn't that qualify as blasphemy? And shouldn't a person that holds such belief be considered the worst of all 'unbelievers'? Yet, many 'brethren' are glib about that belief concept. Listening to some of them, one gets the impression that they have accepted brews from voodoo priests and have come to believe in the powers of their concoction more than even the heathens themselves. Otherwise, what else would cause a Christian to suggest that misfortunes, even those suffered overseas, were caused by voodoo 'sent' from the home country. Wouldn't that make heathen gods omnipresent and close to being omnipotent, something that even the heathens themselves do not claim? That speaks volumes to how far some Christians have deviated from the faith.  That is one additional reason why we must all speak up, because our silence is killing the church!

Enter this book, The Parable of the Lost Shepherds. It is a parable. That makes it fiction. Yet, it attempts to focus interest on the problems of the modern church. I have already mentioned some of them. However, that list is by no means exhaustive. It should include paranoia for imaginary enemies, addiction to titles, easy default to ethnic biases, preponderance of false prophecy, insatiable love of money, predisposition to fear and fear-mongering, and a tendency to accuse people, including closest neighbors, of all manner of outrageous things. The book challenges us to think through the problem and convince ourselves that our inability or reluctance to love others may be the real culprit. This dearth of charity in our dealings with others, coupled with a tendency to justify our shortcomings, opens us up to accusations of bigotry. The book calls for a new Berean spirit that will challenge all things including suspicious doctrines and non-biblical practices. This same spirit would require every one of us to speak up. If we do, and our voices are loud enough, it could trigger a long overdue dialogue on these and related issues. Done right, it could bring peace to a divided church as well as calm to fractured families.  Those will become 'cities' built on very solid hills, whose lights cannot be hidden. From that vantage point, they will serve as fireflies in a dark world that desperately needs redirection. Is that not the original mission of the church? If you believe in that vision, kindly spread this word as if you have a million voices.  Thanks and God bless.

 

Mansim Chumah Okafor

 

For a copy of the book, please visit

http://www.amazon.com/Parable-Shepherds-Mansim-Chumah-Okafor/dp/1489594272

 

You can also visit our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Parable-of-the-Lost-Shepherds/699100490235414

The Parable of the Lost Shepherds

On a recent visit to my ancestral home in Nigeria, I was shocked to learn that the spirit of love and fellowship that held my big family together was no more. I could not believe it. To help you understand my shock, a brief background narrative is necessary.

I come from a reasonably large family--seven uncles and one aunt. My parents had eight of us.  My uncles and aunt made up for whatever shortfall they perceived by leaving my siblings and I with so many cousins that it was a burden keeping up with names. Add my nieces and nephews, and we were enough to start a modest village. Yet, we were close. The relationship was such that when I ran out of money in my final year at the university, an uncle sent me the life savings of his recently deceased son, even though he had other needs yearning for attention! This story will suffer serious injustice if I fail to mention thatdespite such commendable acts of charity,Christians of their time considered my family as heathen, just as many of us think of some groups today!

The above was the state of affairs when I left home for a prolonged sojourn overseas.  It was there that word reached me that my uncles, aunt, and cousins had, one-by-one, converted to the Christian faith.  Believing that each conversion came with enhanced sense of goodwill and the fellowship of the Spirit, I began to imagine that the bond of friendship we had thus far enjoyed would only multiply.  I could not wait to be part of a different experience far superior to what obtained when we were mostly 'lost heathens.'

Hence my shock when, upon arrival, I met a family in disarray, one in which no two families were actually on talking terms. Praying time was more like a war, and many could be heard openly asking for misfortune to befall others. So, what went wrong? Part of the answer was buried in the fact that each family unit went to a different church.  Almost without exception, these were new-age churches whose ministers seemed to have created the impression that they were the voices of God and were the only ones who could reach Him.  Equally disturbing, anyone with a problem ran to his or her 'minister prophet' whose 'prophecies' were considered infallible and absolute. These selected ones promptly inoculated members with very ruinous ideas. Specifically, many were quick to attribute problems to the evil machinations of witches and evil spirits. That wouldn't have been much of a problem had their accusing fingers not led straight to friends and family (spouses, parents, siblings, uncles, aunts, cousins, nephews, nieces, fellow church members, and colleagues)--they pointed at closest neighbors, the very ones whom God specifically asked His followers to love and adore! Yes, they pointed at our emotional sanctuary and cultural support structures, the very stability of the Church, family, and civil society.  No wonder the peace of the family went up in smoke, and the bond that held the village together stood little chance against the vengeful spirit that was unleashed. What remained was humongous debris in a sad and depressing void. Blind to the carnage, and definitely presiding over this gutted carcass, was a plethora of preachers who quoted the Bible from dawn to dusk, and taught their followers everything but the most important, the love of neighbor! As a result, many did the opposite; they hated their neighbors with a vengeance and made up allegations against innocent people. Hear them pray, and one realized that they took delight in binding and casting friends and relatives as if being close to them was a curse. Some go so far as to ask for the demise of others! Imagine what the world would have looked like had God indulged even a small fraction of those requests.

Lost in all these were the core elements of the Christian faith--love and charity, important virtues that would have made it second nature to those who follow the Prince of Peace to, at the least, leave peace along their trail.  And, of course, no one saw the paradox in the fact that there was more peace when the village was crawling with heathens than now that many carry posters heralding their born-again status.

This obvious aberration was by no means peculiar to my family or village.  Spurious allegations, including that of murder, turned out to be common in many parts of the country. The vogue was, and still is, to hang every death on someone's neck, or to insinuate an evil conspiracy by claiming that "our enemies have done their worst."  And the accusers have no reservations stretching the imagination to convince their audience that the alleged murders were not committed with conventional weapons (machete, clubs, guns, or good old poison) but rather through voodoo, juju as they call them there.

Really? Kill a Christian with voodoo? Will that not suggest that God was incapable of protecting His children from fetish contraptions? Wouldn't that imply that the Devil or even native doctors (the voodoo makers) are more powerful than God? Shouldn't that qualify as blasphemy? And shouldn't a person that holds such belief be considered the worst of all 'unbelievers'? Yet, many 'brethren' are glib about that belief concept. Listening to some of them, one gets the impression that they have accepted brews from voodoo priests and have come to believe in the powers of their concoction more than even the heathens themselves. Otherwise, what else would cause a Christian to suggest that misfortunes, even those suffered overseas, were caused by voodoo 'sent' from the home country. Wouldn't that make heathen gods omnipresent and close to being omnipotent, something that even the heathens themselves do not claim? That speaks volumes to how far some Christians have deviated from the faith.  That is one additional reason why we must all speak up, because our silence is killing the church!

Enter this book, The Parable of the Lost Shepherds. It is a parable. That makes it fiction. Yet, it attempts to focus interest on the problems of the modern church. I have already mentioned some of them. However, that list is by no means exhaustive. It should include paranoia for imaginary enemies, addiction to titles, easy default to ethnic biases, preponderance of false prophecy, insatiable love of money, predisposition to fear and fear-mongering, and a tendency to accuse people, including closest neighbors, of all manner of outrageous things. The book challenges us to think through the problem and convince ourselves that our inability or reluctance to love others may be the real culprit. This dearth of charity in our dealings with others, coupled with a tendency to justify our shortcomings, opens us up to accusations of bigotry. The book calls for a new Berean spirit that will challenge all things including suspicious doctrines and non-biblical practices. This same spirit would require every one of us to speak up. If we do, and our voices are loud enough, it could trigger a long overdue dialogue on these and related issues. Done right, it could bring peace to a divided church as well as calm to fractured families.  Those will become 'cities' built on very solid hills, whose lights cannot be hidden. From that vantage point, they will serve as fireflies in a dark world that desperately needs redirection. Is that not the original mission of the church? If you believe in that vision, kindly spread this word as if you have a million voices.  Thanks and God bless.

 

Mansim Chumah Okafor

 

For a copy of the book, please visit

http://www.amazon.com/Parable-Shepherds-Mansim-Chumah-Okafor/dp/1489594272

 

You can also visit our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Parable-of-the-Lost-Shepherds/699100490235414

The St. Catharine College Drama Club aims to transport theater-goers to the past with its production of "The Secret Garden," a story of loss and renewed strength of a young girl, a forgotten boy and a tormented man who are all redeemed through love.

The production will show April 10 -11 at 7 p.m. in St. Catharine Hall and on April 12 at 2 p.m. Seating begins 30 minutes before show time.

"The story is as familiar as you remember," according to "The Secret Garden" publisher, Samuel French. "Mary Lennox, a sullen and spoiled young orphan, is sent to live with her brooding uncle at gloomy Misselthwaite Manor. Discovering a hidden, neglected garden, Mary plans the seeds of new life for all those drawn into her secret refuge."

St. Catharine College President William D. Huston recently announced the 2015 commencement speaker

"I am pleased to announce that the 2015 commencement speaker for St. Catharine College is Mrs. Madeline Abramson, who serves as the chair of the Kentucky Commission on Women, chair of the Red Cross Regional Volunteer Services Advisory Committee, as well as the board chair of the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts," Huston said. "She will be inspirational and send a message to our graduates that they will build upon as they begin their professional careers."

 

Abramson has also twice served as chair of the board at Maryhurst, a Louisville-based organization that offers residential and treatment programs for young women who have experienced abuse and neglect. She continues to serve on Maryhurst's board and executive committee. Her efforts also include serving on the boards of the state Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence and Jewish Hospital/St. Mary's Foundation. She is a former chair of the Board of Directors for the American Red Cross, Kentuckiana Chapter, and continues to serve on its board and executive committee.

In recognition of her work, Madeline has received a series of awards including: the 2014 Sam Swope Community Leader of the Year presented by Kosair Charities; the Maryhurst Shepherd's Heart Award for Volunteer Service; the Hannah G. Solomon Award for community service from the National Council of Jewish Women, Louisville Section; the Women 4 Women Heart of the Community Award; an honorary doctorate in public service from Spalding University; and the Family Scholar House Lucy Award for her commitment to post-secondary education and equality for women.

A native of Louisville, Madeline's public service endeavors have taken her to communities across the Commonwealth. Her efforts with the American Red Cross, Governor's School for the Arts and Maryhurst have allowed her to connect with men and women who share a commitment to enriching the lives of their communities and fellow Kentuckians. Madeline remains committed to supporting the causes close to her heart and looks forward to meeting and working closely with Kentuckians to make the Commonwealth a better place for both our families and our future.

Mrs. Abramson holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Bellarmine University and an associate degree from the University of Louisville. She and her husband, Lt. Governor Jerry Abramson, have a son, Sidney.

St. Catharine College's senior management class will be hosting this year's Military Appreciation 5K Run/Walk on Saturday, April 18. This annual event will be used to raise funds to support women veterans residing at the Thomson-Hood Veterans Home.

The chip-timed race starts on the college campus at 8 a.m. The course is relatively easy as it goes toward downtown Springfield on old Highway 150 to the turnaround point. An awards ceremony will be held immediately after the race concludes.

Runners, walkers, and amblers alike can register online at active.com by searching St. Catharine 5K or can receive an emailed application by contacting Dr. Dave Donathan at St. Catharine College (859-336-5082). Race day registrations begin at the college at 7 a.m. on April 18.

On Friday, March 20, representatives of The Berry Center and the Berry Farming Program attended and hosted an informational booth at the Institute for Healthy Air, Water, and Soil's Louisville Health and Harmony Initiative Symposium at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage. The symposium featured local and global leaders in ecology-based community development, including the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall. 

During the symposium, Prince Charles visited the information table of The Berry Center and the Berry Farming Program, and BFP student Shelby Floyd and Dr. Leah Bayens, as well as TBC's Katie Ellis and Mary Jane Yates, had the opportunity to tell him a bit about the work done by The Berry Center and the Berry Farming Program to bolster and diversify agriculture through advocacy, policy, and education. His Royal Highness, a friend of Wendell Berry's, previously recorded a note for the 2013 Resettling of America Conference at St. Catharine College in which he expressed his interest in the BFP's "major in homecoming" and our efforts, as His Royal Highness put it, "to reinstate culture into the business of producing food." In this light, it was particularly fitting for Shelby to say a few words about his study in the farming and ecological agrarianism degree and about his visions for diversified, local agriculture. 

 

Prince Charles, introduced by Wendell Berry, delivered a keynote address at the Cathedral of the Assumption in which he exhorted the audience to "remember that the ultimate source of all economic capital is Nature's capital" and to keep in mind that "we are not separate from Nature--like everything else, we are Nature."

  

Ten BFP representatives attended the symposium: Shelby Floyd, Hannah Spaulding, Sie' Tioye', Lusekelo Nkuwi, Ruth Kayembe, Matt Nadorff, Shaak Rose, Suraj Neupane, Dr. Shawn Lucas, and Dr. Leah Bayens. The group also listened in on talks by renowned thought leaders ranging from The Land Institute's Wes Jackson and the Sustainable Food Trust's Patrick Holden to food and farming writers Alice Waters and Eric Schlosser. 

The St. Catharine College Athletic Training Program took an opportunity to kick off National Athletic Training Month in industrial fashion as they put on their hard hats to explore the world of industrial athletic training.

"Working in industry is a growing field for athletic trainers," said Athletic Training Program Director Justin Farr. "It is an opportunity for students who want to get their feet wet in a non-traditional setting."

The athletic training students took the opportunity to explore a local manufacturing company and the roles that athletic trainers play in the setting. 

"The crew at the company did a great job at allowing our students to not only have an inside view of industrial athletic training, but a hands on opportunity to work with their data collection equipment," Farr said.

The students were able to test their skills on the same equipment used to place newly hired employees in positions that meet their skill set and body makeup. Equipment ranged from flexibility measures in a seated or standing position to a fine motor control testing apparatus.

"Athletic trainers are pivotal in theses settings," Farr said. "They allow the company to make quantifiable decisions as to where to place new employees and lower the risk of injury. Athletic trainers spend a great deal of time with athletes preventing injuries on the field, so it only stands to reason that they can apply some of the skill sets in the workplace."

Students were able to see first-hand the training and conditioning implemented by the athletic training staff at the company and how it affected the number of injuries in the plant. Additionally, students learned the techniques used when an employee reported and injury and how it was handled by the staff.

"These plants are so advanced, that the athletic training staff has videos of every possible function that an employee may have in the company. All the way from quality control to installing parts," Farr said.

The video system used by the staff allowed the athletic trainers to pinpoint with accuracy the type of injury that an employee may be suffering, thus allowing a more successful return to work.

"Overall, it was a great day and invaluable for our students," Farr said. 

 

Sr. Mary Angela Shaughnessy, dean of the graduate school at St. Catharine College, will receive the Dean's Award from the Loyola Marymount University School of Education and the LMU Center for Catholic Education at the 2015 National Catholic Educational Association Convention in Orlando on April 8.

"As a Distinguished Fellow of the Center for Catholic Education, Sr. Mary Angela Shaughnessy has collaborated with faculty and students in the School of Education's Catholic education programs and served on School of Education doctoral candidate committees," according to a Loyola Marymount University press release. "Sister Mary Angela Shaughnessy holds a Ph.D. in Educational Administration and Supervision from Boston College, a Juris Doctorate and master's degree in English from the University of Louisville, and a master's degree in Educational Administration and bachelor's degree from Spalding University in Louisville, Ky."

According to the LMU website, LMU's Center for Catholic Education "strengthens and supports Catholic schools through teacher preparation, leadership development, research, and professional development and outreach."

Check out the long list of events scheduled for Women's History Month at St. Catharine College. Mark your calendars and join us for these fantastic events.

The Shao Lin Chronicles: The Wisdom of Bodhidharma is a fictional book based on the pseudo-historical account of Bodhidharma, who brought Chan (which became Zen) Buddhism to China, and his student Hui-k'o, nicknamed "Te" in this book. Specifically, Bodhidharma takes up residence in a cave near the famous Shao Lin Monastery. Te finds Bodhidharma and begins to visit him on a regular basis, along with maintaining his regular duties as a monk, including teaching the local students about the life of Buddha. Eventually, Te must face the fact that even after learning so much and growing spiritually, he has not fulfilled Bodhidharma's request, and as a result, he has not attained enlightenment. Eventually, Te paves the way for Bodhidharma to be introduced to the masters at Shao Lin. And Shao Lin, based on the teachings of Bodhidharma, eventually becomes the birthplace of martial arts and chi kung.

Don Giles is a professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies at St. Catharine College. He holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Kentucky and is a specialist in Asian Philosophy and World Religions, as well as a variety of meditation techniques. Dr. Giles has years of administrative and teaching experience at St. Catharine College and the University of St. Francis, Lexington Community College, and the University of Kentucky. In addition to this work, Dr. Giles has published in numerous mediums, including the Journal of the History of Philosophy, The Journal of the National Academic Advising Association, as well as his first book, Schopenhauer, Suffering and Salvation: On the Relation between Reality and Happiness and many forthcoming works.

Please save the date as we celebrate the 25th year of our celebrity golf tournament on June 12 - 13. For more information, follow the link or email kbennett@sccky.edu.

St. Catharine College will be hosting the Patriot Career Fair on Thursday, April 9 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Lourdes Hall gymnasium. Many agencies will be attending offering a variety of summer jobs, fall jobs, internships, volunteer positions and jobs for soon-to-be graduates. The fair is free and open to the public. Please join us on April 9 to make contacts, learn more about the skills these agencies are looking for and potentially come away with a new employment or volunteer opportunity.

The agencies that have confirmed attendance are:

Aflac

AIKCU - Frankfort Internships

Alltech

Baptist Health Louisville

Communicare

Creative Lodging Solutions

Enterprise

First Investors Corporation

FiveStar Food Mart

Fort Knox Federal Credit Union

Hardin Memorial Health

Kentucky Career Center

Kentucky Department of Corrections

Loretto Motherhouse

Lowe's

Maxim Healthcare Services

Signature Healthcare

Spartan Staffing

Springfield Nursing and Rehab

US Bank

St. Catharine College will play proud host of the premiere of a new documentary film by one of Springfield's native sons on March 26 at 6 p.m. in Pettus Auditorium. St. Catharine is joined in hosting by Gov. Steve Beshear and First Lady Jane Beshear, as well as the Kentucky Commission on Women.

The film, titled "Dreamers & Doers: VOICES of Kentucky Women," was produced by Michael Breeding Media Inc. Breeding is originally from Washington County. Another local connection is that of St. Catharine College Professor of Art Bettye Brookfield, who is a Washington County resident and a member of the Kentucky Commission on Women. Brookfield and Dr. Tara Tuttle, associate professor of English at St. Catharine College, will serve as official hosts for the evening. 

The hourlong documentary profiles more than 40 Kentucky women and their achievements.

Tickets are free, but required to attend the premiere. To reserve tickets, call (502) 564-2611 and ask for Donna or visit women.ky.gov to reserve tickets.

A reception will be held following the premiere.

Dignitaries expected to attend include Lt. Governor Crit Luellen, Chair of the Kentucky Commission on Women Madeline Abramson, Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Women Eleanor Jordan, Springfield Mayor Debbie Wakefield, Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles, St. Catharine College President William D. Huston, St. Catharine College Provost Dr. Cindy Gnadinger, St. Catharine College Board of Trustees Chairman John Turner, Sr. Diane Traffas, Bardstown Police Chief Rick McCubbin, Nelson County Sheriff Ed Mattingly and Washington County Distinguished Young Woman Erika Weir.

The St. Catharine College philosophy and religious studies department is hosting Dia-Logos II: An Inquiry into the Pillar of Ministry, Spirituality and Service to the Homeless on March 16 at 5 p.m. in Pettus Auditorium, which is located inside the Richard S. Hamilton Health & Sciences Building.

The program will feature three guests: Ginny Ramsey, Barry McGuffin and Michael Whiting.

Ramsey co-founded the Catholic Action Center in 2010 and is described as the Mother Theresa of Lexington. She is currently the executive director of the Catholic Action Center, God's Net (a warehouse providing clothing and laundry services) and the Community Inn (an overnight shelter in Lexington).

McGuffin enrolled at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in 2011 and began volunteering at the New Life Center in Bardstown. In 2013, he became the executive director of Bethany Haven, a homeless shelter for women and children in Bardstown.

Whiting is a peacemaker with St. William Church in Louisville. He designs and facilitates social justice retreats for Catholic Charities' Parish and Social Concerns Program. Whiting is one of the founders of Sowers of Justice Network, a voice of progressive Christian faith communities.

The event is free and open to the public. 

St. Catharine College and FiveStar convenience stores recently announced a partnership that will keep college costs affordable and assist students in meeting their educational goals.

Beginning in the 2015 fall semester, St. Catharine College with offer $500 FiveStar scholarships to new, first-time, full-time students who live at home and commute daily to campus. Every new, first-time, full-time student at St. Catharine will be eligible to receive a $500 scholarship with a choice to apply the scholarship toward tuition or to redeem it for a FiveStar gift card to help lower commuting costs to campus.  Students who choose the gift card option will receive a $250 FiveStar gift card in the fall semester and a $250 FiveStar gift card in the spring semester. The gift card can be redeemed at any of the 76 FiveStar convenience store locations in the state for gas or other items sold.  

For more information about this partnership and information about St. Catharine College, visit www.sccky.edu or register for the upcoming Preview Day on March 14 to learn more.

Congrats to the newly crowned Mr. and Miss St. Catharine, as well as the new Mr. and Miss St. Catharine Junior. Pictured from left to right are Miss St. Catharine Junior Kourtney Current, Jamaal Wilson (standing in for Mr. St. Catharine Junior William Broady), St. Catharine College President William D. Huston, Miss St. Catharine Mariah House and Eric Walker (standing in for Mr. St. Catharine Marc Mason).

St. Catharine College Instructor of Humanities Matthew Branstetter's "Homelessness and Issues of Faith" class was featured in the Sunday, Feb. 22 edition of The Kentucky Standard. 

To view the story online, go here. Note: the Kentucky Standard is behind a paywall, which requires first paying a subscription fee to view the story.  

Congratulations to the 2015 Mr. and Ms. St. Catharine candidates. 

Winners will be announced at halftime of the men's basketball game on Feb. 26. 

Ms. St. Catharine candidates include Lauren Johnston, Megan Wolford, Mariah House and Allison Mattingly. 

The Ms. St. Catharine Junior candidate is Cynthia Cavazos. 

Mr. St. Catharine candidates are Britton Spears and Marc Mason.

Ms. St. Catharine Junior candidates are Vincent Robinson and William Broady. 

St. Catharine College has a long-time relationship with Channel Six Television. Check out these recent episodes of the St. Catharine College Spotlight from January 2015. 

Hemp for Fiber: Decortication Demonstration

KYHIA and St. Catharine's Berry Farming Program offers hemp education

 

St. Catharine, Ky. - The Berry Farming and Ecological Agrarianism Program at St.

Catharine College will host a hemp decortication (processing into fiber material) demonstration on Friday, Feb. 20, at 1 p.m. EST. The event is public and open to those interested in learning about last year's Homegrown By Heroes crop and textile research project conducted through the partnership of Patagonia, Fibershed, Bastcore, Freedom Seed and Feed, and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA).

 

Mike Lewis, Vice President of Freedom Seed and Feed, a Berry Farming Program

student, and Kentucky hemp farmer who tended the Homegrown By Heroes crop, will conduct the demonstration and discuss his experience working with industrial hemp.

 

"The Berry Farming Program at St. Catharine's is dedicated to teaching students the

historic, and all too often forgotten, agrarian principles of Wendell Berry in hopes of empowering its students to 'resettle' America in a sustainable way that provides empowerment and security to the land and its inhabitants," said Lewis, a founding member of the KDA's Homegrown By Heroes program. "I could not imagine a more fitting location for us to process this historic crop and prepare it for market. The sustainable synergy between Fibershed, Patagonia, Freedom Seed and Feed, Bastcore, and the farmers in this process represent the future of the Kentucky artisan fiber industry. American farmers and consumers are fortunate to have these groups working together for our collective future, and I am proud to have been able to play a part."

 

"The Berry Farming Program is pleased to host this historic event at St. Catharine

College. Hemp production holds an important place in Kentucky's agricultural history, and this decortication exercise signals yet another step in re-establishing hemp's part in bolstering sustainable, diversified, family farm production," said Dr. Leah Bayens, Berry Farming Program coordinator at St. Catharine College. "We are proud of BFP student Mike Lewis's leadership in this project and his service to the community testing out propagation and processing techniques. We hope our neighbors near and far will join us to learn about this generations-old practice revitalized in central Kentucky."

 

John Lupien, founder of Bastcore, LLC, said he is honored and thrilled for the

opportunity to process Kentucky's first hemp crop since prohibition with the "hemp gin" decortication system. "Our goal is to provide the missing processing infrastructure, thereby bridging the farm to the end markets," Lupien said. "We hope this work sufficiently proves economic feasibility to a degree that enables the agricultural return of this historic crop to Kentucky and spurs economic revitalization through the myriad industries that currently seek hemp materials for their products."

 

Fibershed's founder, Rebecca Burgess, said: "Fibershed is elated at the opportunity to

facilitate, support, and nurture this emerging Kentucky hemp fiber agricultural movement, and we are very interested in seeing fiber processing and value addition take place on and near farms where the fiber is grown for the enhancement and creation of flourishing rural economies."

 

Last year, Patagonia provided Fibershed with funding to support the Homegrown by

Heroes pilot project in its efforts to create the tools and processing equipment for its first hemp fiber crop. Patagonia is interested in seeing a truly sustainable domestic fiber supply manifest and views hemp farming as a critical step toward renewing an organic American textile culture.

 

"It is a great honor that Patagonia's grant is helping to nudge along the work of folks with such ability and vision," said Patagonia employee Dan Malloy. "I believe it is this kind of work that will bring the ecologic, economic and cultural renewal that our country so desperately needs."

 

"Mike Lewis and the businesses involved in this project are showing that it's possible to

create a supply chain that will serve a prosperous industrial hemp industry," said Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, who has led the charge to legalize industrial hemp production in the Commonwealth since he took office in January 2012. "The caliber of our business partners in this venture - especially Patagonia, with an international profile and a well-earned reputation as a good corporate citizen - shows that business is interested in Kentucky-grown industrial hemp."

 

Josh Hendrix, President and Founder of the Kentucky Hemp Industries Association,

offered to present this event as an educational opportunity for the public. "With 2014 being Kentucky's first year growing and all the circumstances that came into play just trying to get this crop in the ground, it is exciting to see some of our members already being so progressive in their efforts with hemp," said Hendrix. "To rebrand Kentucky as America's Hemp Capital or 'The Hemp State', as it was once known, we will need to rely on such projects and partnerships, as well as others throughout the state to keep Kentucky at the forefront of this emerging industry. Exciting times are certainly ahead of us and we look forward to building off of this momentum in 2015 with even more forward thinking research projects here in the bluegrass to showcase."

Join us for homecoming festivities during the week of Feb. 23 - 27. 

A full week of activities have been planned, including special recognition for the class of 2005 through 2010. Please join us as we celebrate our alumni. 

At last year's 10th International Conference on Sustainability in Croatia, Dr. David Donathan, professor of management at St. Catharine College, presented an interdisciplinary class he teaches which incorporates sustainability and environmental business (eco-business) practices into a business class. At this year's conference in Copenhagen, Donathan took sustainable education inclusion a step farther by showing how to incorporate sustainability and ecological issues into academic courses in any discipline.

According to Donathan, "In education, we fence topics into academic fields. Sustainability is generally agriculture, biology, ecology. By incorporating it into a business class, it seamlessly becomes an integral part of best business practices."

During the workshop, participants discussed sustainability as a universal underpinning to classes and how to weave particular facets into course work to enhance both an understanding of the theory of sustainability and environmental preservation and practical applications which foster care for land and environment. Natural pairings such as tourism, historic site preservation, agriculture, hormone-free cattle, truck gardening, organic fertilizers/pesticides and similar eco-friendly practices.

Following the discussions, participants took part in an interactive-exercise designing a business-based class titled "The Business of Bees." As the class developed, it became a truly multidisciplinary educational experience as subjects included entrepreneurship, sources of revenues from beekeeping, environmental roles of bees and the impact of environmental factors such as urbanization and chemical use on bee populations. In addition to academics, the class was designed to include practical work ranging from visits to apiary and "backyard beekeepers" to actually setting up a small beekeeping operation and later to assisting with a honey harvest.

As the workshop concluded, Donathan emphasized that it is more effective to infuse as many academic courses as possible with sustainability and eco-friendly information so that concern for environmental protection and the opportunities to do so become an underlying, integral part of a student's thought process.
The community is invited to join us for a free mini health fair sponsored by KentuckyOne Health on Wednesday, Feb. 18 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Lourdes Hall gymnasium. Please see the flyer for details.

St. Catharine College President William D. Huston announced to trustees, faculty, staff and students on Feb. 3 that he plans to retire from the presidency when his contract expires at the end of June 2015.

"My upcoming 68th birthday this month coincides with the end of my contract in June," Huston said in a letter he issued to the college community. "After much thought and prayer, I have made the decision to not seek renewal of my contract and to transition into retirement from my presidency at St. Catharine College. I have been very blessed to have had a professional career that has included 40 years in higher education and a 36-year career in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard."

John Turner, the chairman of the St. Catharine College Board of Trustees, said the trustees are very appreciative of the 18 years of service Huston has given to the college and to the tri-county communities.

"When he arrived, there were less than 150 students and an operating budget less than $250,000," Turner said. "Today enrollment exceeds 775 full-time and part-time students, with over280 residential students and an annual operating budget that exceeds $12 million. The campus currently has seven buildings constructed in the last 18 years that represent over $32 million invested. Total investment, including renovations, infrastructure and athletic facilities, is $35 million."

New additions to the campus during Huston's tenure include the Emily W. Hundley Library, the Richard S. Hamilton Health & Science Building, the Spalding Student & Community Center, Aquinas Hall, Althaire Hall, Dominic Hall, Siena Hall and the Cambron-Ice Clock Tower. The college also acquired over 90 acres of adjoining land, as well as two houses.

"We can all feel a great degree of accomplishment and pride as we look back," Huston said. "The community and regional support has been unbelievable.  Nowhere in Kentucky have the local community and region embraced their local college like they have in our tri-county region."

When Huston first came to St. Catharine College, it was one of two remaining junior colleges in Kentucky. During the last 18 years, the school has transitioned from offering two-year degrees to offering four-year and graduate degrees.

"Bill's legacy includes advancing opportunities for many non-traditional students and first-generation college students," Turner said. "That, from my perspective, is President Huston's enduring legacy; the opportunity for people in our tri-county area to acquire an education that affords meaningful career and economic advancement opportunities."

Huston said he looks forward to spending more time with his wife, Linda, his children and his grandchildren while his health is still excellent.

Announcing his intentions now, he said, gives the board of trustees time to find the next president to continue the mission of St. Catharine College and the Dominican Sisters of Peace.

"A new leader with passion and energy will answer this call to take St. Catharine College through the refinement and development of a destination for excellence," Huston said. "Words cannot express how honored I have been to serve the mission of this college, the Dominican Sisters of Peace, board of trustees, faculty, staff, students and all the supporters of this institution of higher learning. Although the journey has not always been easy, it has been one very rewarding in seeing the progress made and most importantly seeing the many new opportunities our students and graduates have today in a competitive world work environment."

St. Catharine College was founded in 1931 and has been sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catharine, now known as the Dominican Sisters of Peace.

"The opportunity to work at St. Catharine College and the Dominican Sisters has provided so many areas of growth," Huston said. "When you work at a mission-driven college supported by the Dominican pillars of prayer, study, ministry and community, you know you have much support as you make your journey."

St. Catharine College students are eligible to apply for The Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc. Scholarships for the 2015-16 academic year. 

To be eligible, applicants must 

  • be a resident of Kentucky
  • be a junior, senior or graduate student for the 2015-16 academic year
  • Attend a Kentucky university with an accredited program
  • Major in horticulture, plant pathology, landscape design, botany, forestry, environmental concerns, urban planning, land management, agronomy or related subjects

Applications will be evaluated on academic record, the applicant's letter, extracurricular, honors and work experiences, financial need and recommendation. 

To mail the application or for more information:

GCKY State Scholarship Chairman

Carcille C. Burchette

717 Redbud Place

Corbin, KY 40701

(606) 344-6164

carcilleburchette@hotmail.com

Thirteen students from five nonprofit private colleges and universities-Alice Lloyd College,Campbellsville UniversityGeorgetown CollegeSt. Catharine College, and the University of Pikeville-are in the state capital this spring getting a close look at the workings of Kentucky state government.

The students were selected through a competitive process to participate in the Frankfort Semester Internship Program, sponsored by the Association of Independent Kentucky Colleges and Universities. Throughout the spring semester they will work approximately 30 hours per week in state agencies or carefully selected organizations tied to the Kentucky political process.

This year's intern class includes students from a variety of backgrounds and majors and, somewhat unusually, three international students. 

  • Cynthia Cavazos, a junior liberal arts and social sciences major at St. Catharine College, is interning with the Office of the Inspector General in the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services.
  • Sarah Haydon is a junior business management major at St. Catharine College. She is interning with the Kentucky Finance and Administration Cabinet.

Interns are supervised and guided throughout the semester by program coordinator Richard Wilson, a member of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame. In addition to their work experience, they complete two upper-division academic seminars focused on public administration and Kentucky government and politics. Completion of the program qualifies them for up to a full semester of academic credit from their home institutions. Interns also receive a $2,500 stipend to partially cover their living expenses for the semester.

Since its inception in the year 2000, 129 students from Kentucky's 19 independent colleges and universities have participated in the AIKCU Frankfort Semester Internship Program. More information about the AIKCU internship program is available at http://www.aikcu.org/frankfortsemesterinternships/.

The Berry Farming Program students were introduced and shared their testimonies on Jan. 25 at Waterfront Park Place in Louisville at a reception held in their honor. 

To view the event in its entirety, click the video below. 

To learn more about the program and how to apply, click here. 

St. Catharine College Professor of Criminal Justice and Sociology Dr. Harry Toder recently published a book review of 41: A Portrait of My Father

Toder's review was published in the Jan. 21 edition of The Springfield Sun. The online version of the review can be found here: http://www.thespringfieldsun.com/content/41-portrait-my-father

On a cool, foggy, fall morning, Jacob Settles greeted the day early to feed the cows.
The cows are normally in the fields, but on this morning they're in the lots close to the Settles home in Washington County. Johnson grass and frost make a toxic combination for cows, he said, so they were brought in from the fields.
Settles, who majored in business management, is the third member of his family to graduate from St. Catharine College.
His mother, Charlotte Settles, graduated from here, as did his older brother, Jordan.
This trio of St. Catharine alums aren't just family, they're business owners.
Rising Sons Beef, a conception-to-consumption enterprise (as Jacob put it), is owned and operated equally by the mother and her sons. In fact, Jacob has been in the business since 2007 (long before he set foot on a college campus).
The Settles family, under the Rising Sons Beef name, sells freezer beef across the country. The cattle raised by Rising Sons are on the Settles' farm from birth-to-slaughter.
"They're on our farm and we know everything that's been done to them," Jacob said. "They're antibiotic, hormone and steroid-free beef. I can say that and I guarantee that because they've never left my farm and I'm the one handling the animals so I know that that's true."
The beef does leave the farm briefly for processing before it's distributed. The family sends it to Central Kentucky Custom Meats, a USDA-inspected plant in Casey County.
"That's the only time it's out of our hands. After it's been processed, we go pick it up and we'll deliver it to you," Jacob said. "The first time you technically have to touch it is when you walk to your freezer to see what you want for dinner."
Jacob said that Rising Sons guarantees the beef is USDA Choice.
"So you get a very, very good product," he said.
Jacob's dad, Jeff, ran the business in a similar fashion but on a smaller scale for about 30 years before he passed away. When he passed, the family kept the business going.
Jacob said selling beef is something he's known his whole life.
"Tobacco was what we did when I was growing up, but in 2003 (at the time of the tobacco buyout) I was 10 years old. The majority of my working life, this is all I've known," he said.
When he was nine-years-old, he and Jordan were given a heifer, he said.
"From then, we increased our own herd as far as that heifer would have a calf and we'd either sell it or keep it back and we grew that way through raising our own heifers. But when my dad passed away, we officially took over the whole operation in conjunction with my mother, all on equal thirds," he said.
His family took the tobacco buyout in 2003 and started selling beef on a larger scale in 2005. Jeff Settles passed away in 2007 and the company name was born in 2009.
As time went on, Jacob entered high school and continued with the business. He also got involved with a lot of extracurricular activities and earned 30 hours of college credit before he graduated from high school. As a result, Jacob has learned excellent time management skills.
Jacob said taking on so much was his own choice, so he had to learn how to get things done. Not much changed when he came to college and graduated in two-and-a-half years while running a business full time, earning membership in the Alpha Chi National Honor Society and serving on the planning committee of the first-ever Patriot Career Fair.
"I'm very task oriented," he said. "I don't waste a lot of time. A lot of days my lunch time consists of about 10 minutes whenever I can find it."
"Jacob has had to become an excellent time manager," Dr. Dave Donathan, professor of business management at St. Catharine, said. "As a fulltime undergraduate student as well as a full-time independent business man, he has to make the most of every hour. His ability to prioritize tasks and his self-discipline have enabled him to successfully fill both roles."
Planning has also been crucial for Jacob.
He set up his class schedule so that he was only on campus two days a week (sometimes three), which often led to long days and late nights at St. Catharine. It also meant choosing electives that fit into his schedule instead of choosing electives he just wanted to take.
While already operating a successful business, Jacob said he chose to pursue a degree at St. Catharine for a variety of reasons.
"Things change. Events happen. You don't know the future," he said. "I need an education as a back-up plan for one and secondly you never stop learning. The day that you stop learning is when we go out of business or something else has to change."
His presence at St. Catharine College has benefitted Rising Sons Beef and the classes he has taken.
"I've been able to use some of the courses that I had at St. Catharine to implement certain decision-making skills, to use certain concepts within the business that I didn't have previously and implement those," he said.
"He sees first-hand how theory works when applied in real world," Donathan said. "This experience has also allowed him to provide an outside perspective to class discussions which enables students to better understand the difference between 'what should happen' and what actually happens when the theoretical and the actual collide outside the classroom."
Jacob officially graduates in December with a business degree. From there, he'll continue with running Rising Sons Beef with his mother and brother.
Rising Sons Beef can be found on Facebook or contacted via phone at (859) 262-5166 or (859) 805-0724. Rising Sons has shipped beef all over the country including Illinois, Florida, Tennessee, Indiana and, as he put it, from Paducah to Pikeville.

St. Catharine College professor Dr. Becky Meadows will be the first featured author of the college's spring author series.

Meadows will be speaking about her new book, Damnation in Matthew Lewis's The Monk: A Hermeneutic-Phenomenological Approach.

"I worked with Cambria Press for two years on the book, but there are probably two additional years of research and writing involved in it. It's actually a revision of my doctoral dissertation," Meadows said.

The English professor said she fell in love with hermeneutic phenomenology in relation to Gothic literature, art and film when she was a Ph.D. student at the University of Louisville.

"I have loved Gothic and horror since I was a child and my older brother and I watched the Universal Monsters films such as Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, Dracula, The Creature from the Black Lagoon, etc.," Meadows said. "Hermeneutic phenomenology is really a type of philosophy, and I was bitten by the philosophy bug when I began taking philosophy courses at the University of Louisville. My studies in culture concentration for my Ph.D. included 18 graduate hours in philosophy."

Meadows will speak on the second-floor mezzanine of the Emily W. Hundley Library on Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. The event is free and the public is invited to attend.

The event is sponsored by the Emily W. Hundley Library, rtl3 and Alpha Chi. Planning is underway for additional authors in the spring series. 

Sign up today to give blood on Tuesday, Jan. 27. Follow the link to sign up online.

The Kentucky Mu chapter of the Alpha Chi National College Honor Scholarship Society earned Star Chapter honors for 2013-14.

According to a letter from Lara Q. Noah, director of operations at  Alpha Chi, St. Catharine College's chapter was one of 47 out of nearly 300 institutions that met the criteria.

"This award recognizes your institution's important role in Alpha Chi and its support for the ideals of the society," Noah wrote.

According to Noah, the criteria for earning the distinction include inducting members locally, sending at least one faculty sponsor and one student member to the annual convention, having at least one student presentation on the convention program, nominating at least one student for a national Alpha Chi fellowship or scholarship and sponsoring at least one on-campus program in promotion of scholarship.

"Clearly your leadership of Alpha Chi affects individual students and your campus academic community," Noah wrote.

According to the Alpha Chi website, the organization is a national college honor society that admits students from all academic disciplines. Membership is limited to the top 10 percent of an institution's juniors, seniors and graduate students. There are approximately 300 chapters, located in almost every state and in Puerto Rico, which induct more than 12,000 members annually.
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